The Higher Education and Research forge

Home My Page Projects Code Snippets Project Openings Complex Surface Machining Optimization
Summary Activity SCM

SCM Repository

authorJean-Max Redonnet <jean-max.redonnet@unniv-tlse3.fr>
Sat, 9 May 2020 01:15:42 +0000 (03:15 +0200)
committerJean-Max Redonnet <jean-max.redonnet@unniv-tlse3.fr>
Sat, 9 May 2020 01:15:42 +0000 (03:15 +0200)
24 files changed:
Publis/article0.tex [deleted file]
Publis/biblioA0.bib [deleted file]
Publis/imagesA0/3outils.png [deleted file]
Publis/imagesA0/T1check.jpg [deleted file]
Publis/imagesA0/T2check.jpg [deleted file]
Publis/imagesA0/cutterBE.png [deleted file]
Publis/imagesA0/cutterT.png [deleted file]
Publis/imagesA0/cuttersSlope.png [deleted file]
Publis/imagesA0/cuttersSlope.xcf [deleted file]
Publis/imagesA0/end_mill_types.png [deleted file]
Publis/imagesA0/fc_check.jpg [deleted file]
Publis/imagesA0/inclined_choi.png [deleted file]
Publis/imagesA0/inclined_tile.png [deleted file]
Publis/imagesA0/inclinedchoi_spheric.png [deleted file]
Publis/imagesA0/inclinedchoi_toric.png [deleted file]
Publis/imagesA0/inclinedtile_spheric.png [deleted file]
Publis/imagesA0/inclinedtile_toric.png [deleted file]
Publis/imagesA0/pdir_principle.pdf [deleted file]
Publis/imagesA0/pdir_principle.pdf_tex [deleted file]
Publis/imagesA0/pdir_principle.svg [deleted file]
Publis/imagesA0/plan_principal.png [deleted file]
Publis/imagesA0/plan_slope.png [deleted file]
Publis/imagesA0/reff_torus.png [deleted file]
Publis/imagesA0/sc_check.jpg [deleted file]

diff --git a/Publis/article0.tex b/Publis/article0.tex
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index d89ed61..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,820 +0,0 @@
-\documentclass{article}
-\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
-\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
-%\usepackage[french]{babel}
-\usepackage{soulutf8}
-\usepackage[dvipsnames, svgnames]{xcolor}
-\usepackage[ruled]{algorithm2e}
-\usepackage{amsmath}
-\usepackage{amssymb}
-\usepackage{stmaryrd}
-\usepackage{graphicx}
-\usepackage{tikz}
-%\usepackage{pgfplots}
-\usepackage{caption}
-\usepackage{subcaption}
-%\usepackage{hyperref}
-% \usepackage{siunitx}
-\usepackage[squaren, Gray, cdot]{SIunits}
-\usepackage{multirow}
-
-\usepackage{vmargin}
-\setmarginsrb{2cm}{1.5cm}{2cm}{1.5cm}{1cm}{0.5cm}{1cm}{1cm}
-
-\DeclareMathOperator*{\argmax}{arg\,max}
-\DeclareMathOperator*{\argmin}{arg\,min}
-\DeclareMathOperator{\var}{\mathrm{Var}}
-\DeclareMathOperator{\cov}{\mathrm{Cov}}
-\DeclareMathOperator{\E}{\mathrm{E}}
-
-\graphicspath{{imagesA0/}}
-
-\title{A new method for choosing between ball-end cutter and toroidal cutter when machining free-form surfaces}
-\author{Mahfoud Herraz, Jean-Max Redonnet, Marcel Mongeau, Mohammed Sbihi}
-\date{\today}
-
-\begin{document}
-
-\maketitle
-
-\begin{abstract}
-End-milling of free-form surfaces on multi-axis CNC machines are complex and expensive operations involved in the production of many high-value parts, molds and stamping dies. For such operations, the choice of the cutter type to use is very important given the considerable impact of this choice on the quality of the machined surface and the duration of the operation. In this paper, a new method for choosing between ball-end cutter and toroidal cutter is provided.
-
-First an analytical analysis deals with the simple case of an inclined plane. This study makes it possible to highlight some critical parameters to be the decisive factors in the choice of a cutter type. This study is also validated by a numerical example. Then, the whole procedure is extended to free-form surfaces, focusing on the best way to translate parameters defined for planes to parameters significant for surfaces. The proposed procedure is afterward validated through two practical tests cases. The last section is devoted to a discussion summarizing pros and cons of our approach.
-
-\end{abstract}
-
-\section{Introduction}
-
-\subsection{State of the art}
-
-The quality constraint of the surface is commonly expressed in terms of maximum scallop height, denoted $s_h$, which corresponds to the residual unmachined stock thickness left by the tool between two adjacent trajectories. This value imposes the step-over distance $s_{od}$ that can be used during the millling of the surface. Roughly speaking, the step-over distance is the distance between two adjacent trajectories. The relation between $s_h$ and 
-$s_{od}$ is well-known and fully developped in \cite{redonnet_study_2013}. The step-over distance is a key parameter for end-milling of free-form surfaces because, for a given scallop height, a greater $s_{od}$ leads to less trajectories and thus a reduced machining time.
-
-Numerous authors, such as \cite{kumazawa_preferred_2015,liu_tool_2015,chiou_machining_2002,blackmore_analysis_1992,mann_generalization_2002}, have adressed these issues and a lot of them use the concepts of effective radius and sweep curve to do so. The sweep curve, is the curve lying on the cutter surface, that defines the final profile of the cutter passage \cite{sheltami_swept_1998,roth_surface_2001}. From a kinematics point of view, the sweep curve is given by $\mathbf{n} \cdot \mathbf{F} = 0$ where $\mathbf{F}$ is the feed direction and $\mathbf{n}$ the normal vector that can be calculated in each point of the cutter surface. Then, for a given cutter, the effective radius (denoted $R_{eff}$) is defined as the radius of curvature at the cutter contact point of the projection, in a plane normal to the feed direction, of the sweep curve. The direct impact of effective radius on machining time is thus well established. But effective radius calculation may indeed vary a lot depending on the cutter geometry in use.
-
-\subsubsection{Cutter types}
-End-milling of freeform surfaces can be performed with various kind of tools. Actually 3 types are commonly used (figure \ref{fig:end_mill_types}):
-\begin{itemize}
- \item the flat-end cutter, that is less used because of the sharp marks it's leaving on the part surface
- \item the spherical, or ball-end cutter, which is the most commonly used in industry because using it toolpaths are easy to calculate
- \item toroidal cutter, which have been proven to be capable of best results than ball-end cutter but is much harder to handle in calculation.
-\end{itemize}
-
-\begin{figure}[ht]
- \centering
- \begin{tikzpicture}
-  \node[above right] (img) at (0,0) {\includegraphics[width=0.4\textwidth]{end_mill_types.png}};
-  \node at (30pt,0pt) {flat-end mill};
-  \node at (102pt,0pt) {ball-end mill};
-  \node at (174pt,0pt) {toroidal mill};
- \end{tikzpicture}
- \caption{The 3 main tool types used in end-milling}
- \label{fig:end_mill_types}
-\end{figure}
-
-An important parameter for choosing cutter geometry is the effective radius. This notion was initially introduced in \cite{vickers_ball-mills_1989}.
-
-For a practical usage, the effective radius $R_{eff}$ can be calculated as follows:
-\begin{itemize}
- \item flat-end cutter: its effective radius depends on the tilt angle $\phi$. As defined in \cite{vickers_ball-mills_1989}: $R_{eff}=\frac{R}{\sin{\phi}}$
- \item ball-end cutter: its effective radius is equal to the tool radius regardless of the tool orientation: $R_{eff}=R$
- \item toroidal cutter: its effective radius depends on the tool radius $R$, the torus radius $r$, the steepest slope $s$ and the angle between the machining direction and the steepest slope direction $\alpha$. The equation \ref{eq:Reff} proposed by \cite{redonnet_study_2013} details the expression of $R_{eff}$.
-\begin{equation}\label{eq:Reff}
- R_{eff}=\frac{(R-r)\cos^2\alpha}{\sin{s}\left(1-\sin^2{\alpha}\sin^2{s}\right)}+r
-\end{equation}
-\end{itemize}
-
-The spherical tool is widely used in industry because it does not require calculation of the effective radius, which makes the generation of machining paths quite simple. In addition, it leaves smoother marks on the surface than a flat-end tool, which results in less roughness. However, the flat-end cutter allows greater effective radius than its spherical tool counter-part. The toroidal cutter, as shown in \cite{bedi_toroidal_1997} inherits the merits of both previously mentionned cutters. Actually, it may allow, depending on the machining direction and surface caracteristics, greater effective radius than the spherical tool while leaving smoother traces on the surface than a same radius flat-end cutter.
-
-Nowadays flat-end mills are, so to speak, no longer used for finishing free-form surfaces because of the pronounced marks they left on the surface, leading to a high roughness in the feed direction \cite{cho_five-axis_1993,kim_effect_1994}. Therefore they are not taken into consideration in the following study.
-
-Figure \ref{fig:cuttersSlope} shows step-over distances allowed by ball-end cutter (left) and toroidal cutter (right), when machining in the steepest slope direction (blue cutter) or in a direction perpendicular to this one (green cutter). All the scallop heights are the same across the whole figure. A simple plane have been chosen as surface to make the figure easier to read, but the same results are obtained for free-form surfaces.
-
-\begin{figure}[ht]
- \centering
- \begin{tikzpicture}
-  \node[above right] (img) at (0,0) {\includegraphics{cuttersSlope.png}};
-  \node at (3cm,0pt) {ball-end mill};
-  \node at (9cm,0pt) {toroidal mill};
- \end{tikzpicture}
- \caption{Ball-end mill versus toroidal cutter regarding surface slope}
- \label{fig:cuttersSlope}
-\end{figure}
-
-On this figure, one can see that for the ball-end mill, the effective radius and thus the step-over distance is the same whatever the milling direction chosen. It is also clear that the use of a toroidal mill in the stepest slope direction leads to better results than the use of a ball-end mill in the same conditions, while the use of a toroidal cutter in the direction perpendicular to the stepest slope direction leads to worse results than the use of a ball-end mill in the same conditions.
-
-It has been proven in \cite{djebali_milling_2015} that the effective radius of a toroidal cutter of radius $R$ and $r$ is superior to that obtained by a spherical tool of radius $R$, when the angle $\alpha$ is within the range $\left[\unit{-35}{\degree},\unit{35}{\degree}\right]$. This condition is sufficient regardless of the values of $R$, $r$ and $s$.
-
-The scallop height can be calculated either by approximating the geometry of the surface and the tool, as proposed by \cite{warkentin_five-axis_1996} and \cite{vickers_ball-mills_1989}, or by using numerical methods, as does \cite{redonnet_etude_1999} which deduces the scallop given two consecutive path on the surface, the step-over distance, the tool geometry and orientation, by considering the intersections of the tool positions in adjacent path.
-
-
-\subsubsection{Kinematics concerns}\label{sec:kinematics}
-
-The production cost of a surface is directly linked to the machining time. Many authors, for example \cite{griffiths_toolpath_1994, djebali_using_2015, makhanov_optimization_2007, park_tool-path_2000, park_tool-path_2003, lazoglu_tool_2009, roman_three-half_2006}, assumed that the machining time is proportional to the length of the toolpath, and thus focus on minimizing the toolpath length rather than the machining time. This approximation is not exact unless the speed of the tool is constant, which is ideal but pretty much not realistic. In practice, the cutter must decelerate when arriving to an acute angle (i.e. a linear path with tangency discontinuity). Likewise, it has to accelerate once this angle passed. Obviously the cutter could not pass throught a tangency discontinuity without lowering its speed to zero. To avoid a complete zero speed, current numerical controller (NC) allows a curved path with a given tolerance, but this tolerance is kept small enough to not have visible impact on real path. Thus feed speed still have to decrease approaching sharp angles and then to increase back once this angle passed. Further explanation (and optimization) of this problem can be found in \cite{pessoles_modelling_2012}.
-
-Therefore, the kinematic capabilities of the CNC machine should be considered since the tool displacement caracteristics must be kept within these capabilities.
-
-\vspace{\baselineskip}
-In order to calculate time needed to go throught a linear path portion between two acurate angles some values need to be known:
-\begin{itemize}
- \item the nominal feed rate denoted $V$ (\unit{\meter\per\second})
- \item the maximum acceleration denoted $A_{max}$ (\unit{\meter\per\second\squared})
- \item the maximum gradient of acceleration, also called jerk, denoted $J_{max}$ (\unit{\meter\per\cubic\second})
-\end{itemize}
-Using these notations, three cases may arise:
-\begin{enumerate}
- \item nominal feed rate $V$ and maximum acceleration $A_{max}$ are achieved
- \item nominal feed rate $V$ is achieved but not the maximum acceleration $A_{max}$
- \item nominal feed rate $V$ and maximum acceleration $A_{max}$ are not achieved
-\end{enumerate}
-
-For a line segment of length $2l$, according to the values of $V$, $A_{max}$ and $J_{max}$, the following characteristic times are also defined:
-\begin{itemize}
- \item the time to reach maximum acceleration in case 1: $t_A=\frac{A_{max}}{J_{max}}$
- \item the time to reach nominal feed rate in case 2: $t_V=\sqrt{\frac{V}{J_{max}}}$
- \item the time to travel the half length distance $l$ in case 3: $t_l=\sqrt[3]{\frac{l}{J_{max}}}$
-\end{itemize}
-These caracteristics times help to distinguish between previously stated cases. The characterization of each case and the corresponding machining time $t$ are then as follows:
-\begin{itemize}
- \item \textbf{case 1}: if $t_A < t_V$ and $t_A < t_l$
- \begin{equation*}
-  t = 2\frac{l}{V} + \frac{A_{max}}{J_{max}} + \frac{V}{A_{max}}
- \end{equation*}
- \item \textbf{case 2}: if $t_V < t_A$ and $t_V < t_l$
- \begin{equation*}
-  t = 2\frac{l}{V} + 2\sqrt{\frac{V}{J_{max}}}
- \end{equation*}
- \item \textbf{case 3}: if $t_l < t_A$ and $t_l < t_V$
- \begin{equation*}
-  t = 4\sqrt[3]{\frac{l}{J_{max}}}
- \end{equation*}
-\end{itemize}
-
-Hence, the machining time associated with a toolpath increases when the number of acute angles increases eventhough the path length is fixed.
-
-\subsection{Problem statement}\label{subsec:problem_statement}
-
-As it was previously established, using the toroidal cutter along the steepest slope direction maximize the effective radius over the whole surface, which leads to larger step-over distances $s_{od}$ between adjacent paths, which finally reduces the whole toolpath length. However, if the steepest slope direction is near the perpendicular to the surface's largest direction, then the generated toolpath will be composed of shorter paths. In this case, using a ball-end cutter along the surface's largest direction, hereafter called principal direction, may provide better results in terms of machining time, despite a longer toolpath. Indeed, the kinematic behaviour of the tool, that need to decelerate nearing a paths angle and then accerate again once the paths angle passed, is much more penalizing in the first case than in the second one.
-
-In order to illustrate this issue, a rectangular plane surface of width $\unit{56}{\milli\meter}$ and height $\unit{28}{\milli\meter}$ is considered, the slope angle is $\unit{60}{\degree}$ and its direction is perpendicular to the principal direction (figure \ref{fig:mach_plane}). This plane surface is first machined using a toroidal cutter of radii $R=\unit{5}{\milli\meter}$ and $r=\unit{2}{\milli\meter}$ along the steepest slope direction (contained in the plane ($\mathbf{X},\mathbf{Z})$), and after machined using a ball-end cutter of radius $R=\unit{5}{\milli\meter}$ along the principal direction (axis $\mathbf{Y}$). The maximum allowed scallop height is $s_h=\unit{0.01}{\milli\meter}$, which is a standard value in industrial applications. 
-
-\begin{figure}[ht]
-  \begin{center}
-    \begin{tikzpicture}
-        \node[above left] (img) at (-0.2cm,0) {\includegraphics{plan_slope.png}};
-        \node at (-3.2cm, -0.3cm) {(a)};
-        \node[above right] (img) at (0.2cm,0) {\includegraphics{plan_principal.png}};
-        \node at (3.2cm, -0.3cm) {(b)};
-    \end{tikzpicture}
-   \end{center}
-   \vspace{-0.8cm}
-   \begin{flushright}
-    \begin{tikzpicture}
-        \node{legend: axes $\mathbf{X}$/$\mathbf{Y}$/$\mathbf{Z}$ correspond to Red/Green/Blue vectors};
-     \end{tikzpicture}
-    \end{flushright}
-   \vspace{-0.5cm}
- \caption{Machining of a rectangular planar surface: (a) along the steepest slope direction using a toroidal cutter, (b) along the principal direction using a ball-end cutter}
- \label{fig:mach_plane}
-\end{figure}
-
-Results in terms of effective radius, machining time and toolpath length are reported in table \ref{tab:mach_plane}. The toolpath length is the same, yet it is worth noting that eventhough the effective radius is $9.2\%$ greater in the first case (machining with toroidal cutter along the slope direction), the gain obtained by machining along principal direction using ball-end cutter in terms of machining time is nearly $16\%$.
-
-\begin{table}[ht]
- \centering
- \begin{tabular}{|c|c|c|c|}
-  \hline
-  machining direction & effective radius & machining time & path length \\
-  \hline
-  steepest slope & \unit{5.46}{\milli\meter} & \unit{43.8}{\second} & \unit{2460}{\milli\meter} \\
-  \hline
-  principal & \unit{5}{\milli\meter} & \unit{36.8}{\second} & \unit{2459}{\milli\meter} \\
-  \hline
- \end{tabular}
- \caption{Results of plane surface machined using toroidal cutter along its slope direction and spherical cutter along its principal direction}
- \label{tab:mach_plane}
-\end{table}
-
-To conduct the following tests, a form-factor $\mu$ is defined for the plane such that $\mu^2 = \frac{w}{h}$, where $w$ is the width of the surface and $h$ its height. According this definition, a caracteristic size $H$ may be defined such that $w = \mu\times H$ and $h = \frac{H}{\mu}$. Various tests were run for different values of the slope angle $s$ and this form-factor $\mu$. It was found that the toroidal cutter tends to present better machining time when the slope is close to \unit{0}{\degree} and form-factor close to~1. Conversely, the spherical cutter tends to be more efficient when the slope is close to \unit{90}{\degree} and form-factor is high.
-
-Based on these observations, a well-founded question arises: is it possible to define critical values for the parameters $s$ and $\mu$ that correspond to both cutters having equal machining time, and thus predict the most efficient tool according to given values of the parameters. In the following section, this question is investigated for plane surface.
-
-\section{Study of plane surfaces}
-
-In this section, the efficiency of the torus tool and spherical tool are investigated on a rectangular plane surface as the steepest slope and the length by width form-factor vary. In order to calculate the machining time, a kinematic model of the CNC machine is introduced.
-
-The machining strategy used here is the "\textit{zigzag}" parallel plans, so that a toolpath is composed of a sequence of linear segments put end to end (i.e. NC code: G01). In what follows, the kinematic parameters are fixed to: $J_{max} = \unit{40}{\meter\per\cubic\second}$, $A_{max} = \unit{6}{\meter\per\second\squared}$, $V=\unit{5}{\meter\per\minute}$, and the cutter is defined by outer radius $R = \unit{5}{\milli\meter}$ and torus radius $r = \unit{2}{\milli\meter}$.
-
-\subsection{Analytical study}
-
-\subsubsection{Toroidal cutter along steepest slope direction}
-
-In this section, the machining time using toroidal tool along the slope direction is calculated as a function of the tool geometry, the kinematic parameters and the surface parameters. For any point of the surface, the effective radius of the toroidal tool can be calculated using equation \ref{eq:Reff} with $\alpha = 0$:
-
-\begin{equation*}
- R_{eff} = \frac{R-r}{\sin{s}}+r
-\end{equation*}
-
-The step-over distance is easily calculated for flat surfaces: 
-\begin{equation} \label{eq:pas_transversal}
- sod_1 = 2\sqrt{R_{eff}^2-(R_{eff}-s_h)^2}=2\sqrt{2\,s_h\,R_{eff}-s_h^2}
-\end{equation}
-
-The number of paths is given by:
-\begin{equation*}
- nb_1 = \frac{\mu\,H}{sod_1}
-\end{equation*}
-
-The toolpath length is equal to the total length of the paths plus the step over distances to move from one path to the next.
-
-\begin{equation*}
- L_1 = \frac{H}{\mu}\times nb_1 + nb_1\times p_t = \frac{H^2}{\sqrt{2\,s_h\frac{R-r}{\sin{s}}+2\,s_h\,r-s_h^2}} + \mu\times H
-\end{equation*}
-
-To calculate the machining time the kinematic case occurring must be found (see section \ref{sec:kinematics}). This depends on the value of $H$, since $t_A$ et $t_V$ are known:
-
-\begin{equation*}
- t_A = \frac{A_{max}}{J_{max}} = \frac{6}{40} = \unit{0.15}{\second}\quad \mbox{ and }\quad t_V = \sqrt{\frac{V}{J_{max}}} = \sqrt{\frac{5}{60\times40}} = \unit{0.045}{\second}
-\end{equation*}
-
-Since $t_V<t_A$, the case 1 is dismissed, and the case 2 applies if $t_V<t_l$, which is equivalent to 
-
-\begin{equation*}
- \frac{V^3}{J_{max}^3} < \frac{H^2}{4\,\mu^2\,J_{max}^2}\quad \mbox{whence } \quad \frac{H}{\mu} > 2\,\sqrt{\frac{V^3}{J_{max}}} = \unit{7.6}{\milli\meter}
-\end{equation*}
-
-In the same way, since $t_v < t_A$, the case 3 is equivalent to $t_l < t_V$, thus $\frac{H}{\mu} < \unit{7.6}{\milli\meter}$. This value can be considered too small for machinable surfaces, in the following, the case 2 will be considered instead. Hence, the machining time for a single path is written as:
-
-\begin{equation*}
- t_p = \frac{H}{\mu\,V} + 2\,\sqrt{\frac{V}{J_{max}}}
-\end{equation*}
-
-The machining time necessary to move from one path to the next needs to be calculated also, it depends on the step over distance. The kinematics of the machine corresponds to case 3 if $sod_1 < \unit{7.6}{\milli\meter}$, which is always true since in the worst case ($s=\unit{0}{\degree}$) $sod_1=2(R-r)+2\sqrt{r^2-(r-s_h)^2}=\unit{6.4}{\milli\meter}$. Therefore case 3 is assumed for the calculation of the machining time between two adjacent paths:
-
-\begin{equation*}
- t_{ip} = 4\sqrt[3]{\frac{sod_1}{2\,J_{max}}}
-\end{equation*}
-
-Finally, the total machining time is given in equation \ref{eq:usinage1}:
-
-\begin{equation}
- T_1 = nb_1\times\left(t_p+t_{ip}\right) = \frac{\mu\,H}{sod_1}\left(\frac{H}{\mu\,V} + 2\sqrt{\frac{V}{J_{max}}}+4\sqrt[3]{\frac{sod_1}{2J_{max}}}\right)
- \label{eq:usinage1}
-\end{equation}
-
-\subsubsection{Ball-end cutter along principal direction}
-
-In this section the surface is machined with a spherical tool along the principal direction (axis $\mathbf{Y}$, green in figure \ref{fig:mach_plane}), which is orthogonal to the steepest slope direction (axis $\mathbf{X}$, red in figure \ref{fig:mach_plane}) and the machining time is calculated. In this case, the effective radius is $R_{eff} = R$. It is worth noting that in this case, the toroidal cutter will present an minimal effective radius of $r$ according to this direction. Thus in this case, the ball-end cutter is much more effective than the toroidal cutter.
-
-The step-over distance is written as:
-
-\begin{equation*}
- sod_2 = 2\sqrt{2\,s_hR-s_h^2}
-\end{equation*}
-
-The number of paths in this case is:
-
-\begin{equation*}
- nb_2 = \frac{H}{\mu\times sod_2} = \frac{H}{2\,\mu\,\sqrt{2\,s_h\,R-s_h^2}}
-\end{equation*}
-
-Here again, the toolpath length is equal to the total length of the paths plus the step over distances to move from one path to the next:
-
-\begin{equation*}
- L_2 = nb_2\left(\frac{H}{\mu}+2\,\sqrt{2\,s_h\,R-s_h^2}\right)
-\end{equation*}
-
-Identically to the previous section, the kinematics of the machine is represented by case 2. Thus, the machining time corresponding to one path is calculated:
-
-\begin{equation*}
- t_p = \frac{H\,\mu}{V} + 2\sqrt{\frac{V}{J_{max}}}
-\end{equation*}
-
-And the machining time between two adjacent paths is
-
-\begin{equation*}
- t_{ip} = 4\sqrt[3]{\frac{sod_2}{2\,J_{max}}}
-\end{equation*}
-
-Finally, the total machining time is expressed in equation \ref{eq:usinage2}:
-
-\begin{equation}
- T_2 = nb_2\times\left(t_p+t_{ip}\right) = \frac{H}{\mu\times sod_2}\left(\frac{H\,\mu}{V} + 2\,\sqrt{\frac{V}{J_{max}}}+4\,\sqrt[3]{\frac{sod_2}{2J_{max}}}\right)
- \label{eq:usinage2}
-\end{equation}
-
-\subsubsection{Critical parameters form-factor (width/height) and slope}
-In this section, the machining time $T_1$ associated with toroidal cutter along steepest slope direction and its counterpart $T_2$ associated to ball-end cutter along principal direction of the plane surface are compared.
-
-The kinematic parameters $J_{max}$, $A_{max}$ and $V$, as well as the radii $R$ and $r$ are supposed to be known. We therefore seek to determine which cutter geometry and machining direction is better as a function of the slope $s$ and the form-factor $\mu$ of the surface.
-
-As the form-factor $\mu$ increases, the number of paths in case of using toroidal cutter surpasses its counterpart using spherical cutter, since the steepest slope and principal directions are orthogonal. 
-
-On the other hand, when the slope tends to 0, the effective radius of the toroidal cutter tends to infinity which maximizes the transverse pitch and favors machining with toroidal cutter in the direction of steepest slope. Whereas for a slope equal to $\pi/2$, the effective radius of both tools is equal to $R$.
-
-For a given slope $s$, the critical form-factor $\mu_c$ is defined such as the machining times $T_1$ and $T_2$ asociated to both cutters and directions are equal:
-
-\begin{equation*}
- \begin{split}
- T_2 = T_1 & \Leftrightarrow \frac{H}{\mu\,sod_2}\left(\frac{H\,\mu}{V}+2\sqrt{\frac{V}{J_{max}}}+4\,\sqrt[3]{\frac{sod_2}{2\,J_{max}}}\right) = \frac{\mu\,H}{sod_1}\left(\frac{H}{\mu\,V} + 2\,\sqrt{\frac{V}{J_{max}}}+4\,\sqrt[3]{\frac{sod_1}{2\,J_{max}}}\right) \\
-  & \Leftrightarrow \frac{H\,\mu}{V}+2\,\sqrt{\frac{V}{J_{max}}}+4\,\sqrt[3]{\frac{sod_2}{2\,J_{max}}} = \mu^2\frac{sod_2}{sod_1}\left(2\,\sqrt{\frac{V}{J_{max}}}+4\,\sqrt[3]{\frac{sod_1}{2J_{max}}}\right)+\mu^2\frac{sod_2}{sod_1}\frac{H}{\mu\,V} \\
-  & \Leftrightarrow \frac{sod_2}{sod_1}\left(2\,\sqrt{\frac{V}{J_{max}}}+4\,\sqrt[3]{\frac{sod_1}{2\,J_{max}}}\right)\mu^2+\frac{H}{V}\left(\frac{sod_2}{sod_1}-1\right)\mu-2\,\sqrt{\frac{V}{J_{max}}}-4\,\sqrt[3]{\frac{sod_2}{2J_{max}}} = 0
- \end{split}
-\end{equation*}
-
-The last equation is a second degree polynomial in $\mu$ written:
-
-\begin{equation} \label{eq:mu}
- a\,\mu^2-b\,\mu-c=0
-\end{equation}
-
-With:
-
-\begin{gather*}
- a = \frac{sod_2}{sod_1}\left(2\,\sqrt{\frac{V}{J_{max}}}+4\,\sqrt[3]{\frac{sod_1}{2\,J_{max}}}\right) \\
- b = \frac{H}{V}\left(1-\frac{sod_2}{sod_1}\right) \\
- c = 2\,\sqrt{\frac{V}{J_{max}}}+4\,\sqrt[3]{\frac{sod_2}{2\,J_{max}}}
-\end{gather*}
-
-It is trivial that $a$ and $c$ are positive, moreover, since $0<s<\pi/2$ then $0<\sin{s} < 1$ and
-
-\begin{equation*}
- \frac{R-r}{\sin{s}}+r > R \quad \mbox{thus}\quad sod_1 > sod_2
-\end{equation*}
-
-As a result $b > 0$. The discriminant of equation \ref{eq:mu} is $\Delta=b^2+4ac > 0$. Equation \ref{eq:mu} admits therefore two solutions, one of which is negative since:
-
-\begin{equation*}
- \frac{b-\sqrt{\Delta}}{2a} = \frac{b-\sqrt{b^2+4ac}}{2a} < 0, \mbox{ because } 4ac > 0 \mbox{ and } 2a > 0
-\end{equation*}
-
-Hence, the expression of critical form-factor $\mu_c$ is derrived for a given value of slope $s$:
-
-\begin{equation}\label{eq:fc}
- \mu_c = \frac{\frac{H}{V}\left(1-\frac{sod_2}{sod_1}\right) + \sqrt{\frac{H^2}{V^2}\left(1-\frac{sod_2}{sod_1}\right)^2+16\,\frac{sod_2}{sod_1}\left(\sqrt{\frac{V}{J_{max}}}+2\,\sqrt[3]{\frac{sod_1}{2J_{max}}}\right)\left(\sqrt{\frac{V}{J_{max}}}+2\,\sqrt[3]{\frac{sod_2}{2\,J_{max}}}\right)}}{4\,\frac{sod_2}{sod_1}\left(\sqrt{\frac{V}{J_{max}}}+2\,\sqrt[3]{\frac{sod_1}{2\,J_{max}}}\right)}
-\end{equation}
-
-If $\mu > \mu_c$ then $af^2-bf-c > 0$, which means that $T_1 > T_2$, and therefore machining along principal direction using a spherical cutter is more efficient. Conversely, if $\mu < \mu_c$ then $af^2-bf-c < 0$ and $T_1 < T_2$, machining along the steepest slope direction using toroidal cutter should then be privileged. These results demonstrate the earlier statements.
-
-In the same way, for a given form-factor $\mu$, the critical slope $s_c$ is defined such that the machining times $T_1$ and $T_2$ are equal:
-
-\begin{equation*}
- \begin{split}
-  T_2 = T_1 & \Leftrightarrow T_2 = \frac{\mu\,H}{sod_1}\left(\frac{H}{\mu\,V} + 2\,\sqrt{\frac{V}{J_{max}}}+4\,\sqrt[3]{\frac{sod_1}{2\,J_{max}}}\right) \\
-  & \Leftrightarrow \frac{T_2}{\mu\,H}sod_1-\frac{4}{\sqrt[3]{2\,J_{max}}}\sqrt[3]{sod_1}-\frac{H}{\mu\,V}-2\,\sqrt{\frac{V}{J_{max}}} = 0
- \end{split}
-\end{equation*}
-
-The last equation is a third degree polynomial in $z = \sqrt[3]{sod_1}$ of the form:
-
-\begin{equation}
- z^3-p\,z-q = 0
- \label{eq:pt1}
-\end{equation}
-
-Where:
-
-\begin{gather*}
- p = \frac{4\,\mu\,H}{T_2\,\sqrt[3]{2\,J_{max}}} \\
- q = \frac{\mu\,H}{T_2}\left(\frac{H}{\mu\,V}+2\,\sqrt{\frac{V}{J_{max}}}\right)
-\end{gather*}
-
-It is straight forward that $p$ and $q$ are positive. The Cardano's formula gives the general solution for equation~\ref{eq:pt1}. The discriminant of this equation is: 
-
-\begin{equation*}
- \Delta = 4\,p^3-27\,q^2 = \frac{\mu^2\,H^2}{T_2^2}\left(128\,\frac{\mu\,H}{J_{max}\,T_2}-27\,\left(\frac{H}{\mu\,V}+2\,\sqrt{\frac{V}{J_{max}}}\right)^2\right)
-\end{equation*}
-
-Using numerical values of $V$ et $J_{max}$, limiting the width by height form-factor to 9 (which means $\mu<3$) and assuming surfaces big enough so that machining times order of magnitude is superior to a second ($T_2>\unit{1}{\second}$), it comes that:
-
-\begin{equation*}
- \Delta = \frac{\mu^2\,H^2}{T_2^2}\left(3.2\,\frac{\mu\,H}{T_2}-27\,\left(12\,\frac{H}{\mu}+0.1\right)^2\right) < \frac{\mu^2\,H^2}{T_2^2}\left(9.6\,H-27\left(4\,H+0.1\right)^2\right)
-\end{equation*}
-
-The function $H \rightarrow 9.6\,H-27\left(4\,H+0.1\right)^2$ is negative for $H>0.01$, consequently $\Delta < 0$ for surfaces of area superior to $\unit{100}{\milli\meter\squared}$, this hypothesis is fairly acceptable for machinable surfaces. Hence, equation \ref{eq:pt1} admits one real solution (et two conjugate complexes) that is:
-
-\begin{equation*}
- z = \sqrt[3]{\frac{-q+\sqrt{\frac{-\Delta}{27}}}{2}} + \sqrt[3]{\frac{-q-\sqrt{\frac{-\Delta}{27}}}{2}}
-\end{equation*}
-
-Thus, the expression of the critical slope for a given form-factor $\mu$ can be obtained from
-\begin{equation*}
-\begin{split}
- sod_1^2 = z^6 & \Leftrightarrow 4\,\left(2\,s_h\,R_{eff}-s_h^2\right) = z^6\\
- & \Leftrightarrow R_{eff} = \frac{s_h}{2} - \frac{z^6}{8\,s_h} =\frac{R-r}{\sin{s_c}}+r
-\end{split}
-\end{equation*}
-
-and finally
-\begin{equation}\label{eq:sc}
-s_c = \arcsin{\left(\frac{8\,s_h\left(R-r\right)}{z^6+4\,s_h^2-8\,s_h\,r}\right)}
-\end{equation}
-
-
-If $s < s_c$ then $\sqrt[3]{sod_1}$ is superior to the solution of equation \ref{eq:pt1} and $z^3-pz-q > 0$, which means that $T_2 > T_1$, the use of toroidal cutter along steepest slope direction should then be preferred. Conversely, if $s > s_c$ then $\sqrt{sod_1}$ is inferior to the solution of equation \ref{eq:pt1} and $z^3-pz-q < 0$, that is equivalent to $T_2 < T_1$. In this case, the spherical tool along the principal direction is more efficient. This result is consistent with the fact that the effective radius (and step-over distance $sod_1$) of toroidal cutter decreases as the slope $s$ increases.
-
-\subsection{Numerical validation}
-
-Analytical expressions for critical parameters $\mu_c$ and $s_c$ are given by equations \ref{eq:fc} and \ref{eq:sc} respectively. This section is devoted to checking these expressions using numerical simulations. The machining simulation process used to compute the toolpath for a given parametric surface as a sequence of interpolation points is based on intersection of isoparametric curves and parallel planes. Its implementation heavily relies on algorithms developed in \cite{barnhill_surface/surface_1987}.
-
-First of all, back to the example given in section \ref{subsec:problem_statement}, the slope was $s=\unit{60}{\degree}$ while the form-factor is: $\mu=\sqrt{\frac{\unit{56}{\milli\meter}}{\unit{28}{\milli\meter}}}=\sqrt{2}=1.41$. Using equation \ref{eq:fc}, the critical form-factor is $\mu_c(s)=1.084<\mu$, which is coherent with the fact that machining time using ball-end cutter along principal direction was shorter. As shown by this example, the proposed procedure is able to provide a good hint for the cutter to use in order to obtain the best results. Then, it is possible to improve the procedure by using directly critical parameters.
-
-Then, the machining times $T_1$ and $T_2$ are verified: Both analytical and numerical machining times are evaluated on a grid of $s$ and $\mu$ values such as $s\in\left[\unit{0}{\degree},\unit{90}{\degree}\right]$ and $\mu\in\left[1,\sqrt{10}\right]$. The relative error, defined in equation \ref{eq:rel_error}, is plotted in figure \ref{fig:rel_error}.
-
-\begin{equation}
- \epsilon_i = \frac{\left|T_i^{\mbox{num}}-T_i^{\mbox{anal}}\right|}{\max{\left(T_i^{\mbox{num}},T_i^{\mbox{anal}}\right)}}\quad \mbox{ for } i=1,2
- \label{eq:rel_error}
-\end{equation}
-
-\begin{figure}
- \centering
- \begin{subfigure}{0.4\textwidth}
-  \centering
-  \includegraphics[width=\linewidth]{T1check.jpg}
-  \caption{}
- \end{subfigure}
- \begin{subfigure}{0.4\textwidth}
-  \centering
-  \includegraphics[width=\linewidth]{T2check.jpg}
-  \caption{}
- \end{subfigure}
- \caption{Machining times relative errors: (a) Time $T_1$ along the steepest slope direction using a toroidal cutter, (b) time $T_2$ along the principal direction using a ball-end cutter}
- \label{fig:rel_error}
-\end{figure}
-
-The mean relative error for machining time $T_1$ is $\overline{\epsilon_1}=0.36\%$ while for $T_2$ it is $\overline{\epsilon_2}=4.75\%$. As expected, the error $\epsilon_2$ does not depend on the slope $s$ since machining a flat surface with a spherical tool is not affected by the surface tilt angle.
-
-This error is mainly due to the approximation of the number of paths by the width (or height, acording to machining direction) divided by the step over distance, which is not an integer number. Moreover, the numerical code uses margins from the initial and final borders. As a result, the analytic machining times overestimates its numeric counter-part by nearly the time corresponding to one path. This would also explain the fact that $\epsilon_1 < \epsilon_2$ since the length of a single path is bigger in the second case.
-
-Now that machining time is checked for both tools and directions, the critical parameters $s_c$ and $\mu_c$ are also verified: For this purpose, a sample of values of the form-factor $\mu$ is considered, then $s_c$ is calculated for each $\mu$ in this sample and the (numerical) machining times $T_1$ and $T_2$ should be equal for the couple $\left(\mu,s_c\right(\mu))$. In the same way, the critical form-factor $\mu_c$ is verified. The figure \ref{fig:sc} shows the evolution of $s_c(\mu)$ and the relative error $\epsilon_c(\mu)$ between times $T_1\left(\mu,s_c\right(\mu))$ and $T_2\left(\mu,s_c\right(\mu))$, while figure \ref{fig:fc} shows the evolution of $\mu_c(s)$ and the relative error $\epsilon_c(s)$ between $T_1\left(s,\mu_c\right(s))$ and $T_2\left(s,\mu_c\right(s))$. The error in both cases is around $5\%$, which confirms the validity of the critical parameters expressions. It is worth noting that the error is higher for large form-factors and small slopes, in which case the paths are longer along the principal direction and the approximation of the paths number is source of error.
-
-\begin{figure}[ht]
- \centering
- \includegraphics[width=0.6\linewidth]{sc_check.jpg}
- \caption{Evolution of critical slope $s_c(\mu)$ and machining time relative error $\epsilon_c(\mu)$ with respect to form-factor $\mu$}
- \label{fig:sc}
-\end{figure}
-
-\begin{figure}
- \centering
- \includegraphics[width=0.6\linewidth]{fc_check.jpg}
- \caption{Evolution of critical form-factor $\mu_c(s)$ and machining times relative error $\epsilon_c(s)$ with respect to slope $s$} 
- \label{fig:fc}
-\end{figure}
-
-To sum up, the machining times analytically calculated and the critical parameters were numerically checked. Hence, our appraoch allows to select, for a given surface, the most efficient tool geometry and machining direction without calculating machining times, but only using the slope and form factor, which is straight forward for rectangular flat surfaces. In fact, given a surface and its slope $s$, its form factor $\mu$ is compared to the critical form factor $\mu(s)$ and if $\mu<\mu_c(s)$, then the toroidal cutter along steepest slope direction is selected. Otherwise, the ball-end cutter along principal direction is advised. Equivalently, the slope $s$ can be compared to the critical slope $s_c(\mu)$ and toroidal cutter is privileged if $s<s_c(\mu)$, otherwise the ball-end cutter is selected. The extension of this approach is treated in the following section.
-
-\section{Extension to free-form surfaces}
-
-The objective of this section is to extend the proposed approach on flat rectangular surfaces to general freeform surfaces. First, the theoretical framework is presented, aiming to give a definition of critical parameters. On the base of these critical parameters, an efficient selection of cutter type and machining direction can be performed. Then, the formulated approach is benchmarked with two free form surfaces test case, in order to investigate its validity. 
-
-\subsection{Theoretical study}
-
-The first question to arise when generalizing to free form surfaces is how to define the machinig directions. To do so a $(u,v)$ mesh defined by isoparametric curves is considered in order to obtain a tessellation of the surface. This way, a bunch of elementary surface quads is obtained. Then, for each quad, a sample point is defined as the center of the quad. The machining directions are defined using these sample points denoted $\mathbf{S_i}, i=0..n$.
-
-In the case of a plane, the steepest slope direction is the same whatever the point of the surface taken in consideration. For a freeform surface, the steepest slope direction may vary for any point taken into consideration. In this case the steepest slope direction of the surface is evaluated by the mean of the steepest slope direction calculated at each sample point. This choice is discussed in section \ref{sec:discuss}.
-
-For a rectangular flat surface, the principal direction, along which the surface is the most extended, was parallel to its largest border. It could be seen also, for any surface, as the direction of the line that minimizes the sum of distances from the points of the surface to their orthogonal projection on that line. According the tessellation of the surface previously defined, this sum can be calculated discretely relying on the sample points $\mathbf{S_i}$.
-
- The principal direction corresponds to the line that minimizes the sum of distances $d_i$ from the sample points $\mathbf{S_i}$ to their orthogonal projection on that line. This principle is illustrated on figure \ref{fig:pdir_principle} for few sample points. Thus, finding the principal direction is equivalent to a well-known Principal Component Analysis \cite{abdi_principal_2010} (PCA).
-
-\begin{figure}[ht]
- \centering
- \input{imagesA0/pdir_principle.pdf_tex}
- \caption{Evaluation of the principal direction for a freeform surface: Principle}
- \label{fig:pdir_principle}
-\end{figure}
-
-\subsubsection{Using the covariance matrix to define the principal direction}
-
-Principal Component Analysis is a multivariate statistical procedure for data analysis. It is mainely used for dimensionality-reduction: to condense the information contained in a large number of original variables into a smaller set of new orthogonal variables through linear combinations, with a minimum loss of information. PCA is also used for interpretation of large data set, it reveals relationships between correlated variables. Mathematically, PCA depends upon the eigen‐decomposition of positive semi‐definite matrices and upon the Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) of rectangular matrices.
-
-In our context, for a given surface $\mathcal{S}$, the variables are the coordinates of surface points in the three dimensionnal Euclidian space: $\left(S_x,S_y,S_z\right)$. PCA is performed over the points of the surface $\mathcal{S}$ through eigen-decomposition of its covariance matrix, which gives three orthogonal eigen-vectors $\mathbf{S_I}$, $\mathbf{S_{II}}$ and $\mathbf{S}_{III}$ corresponding to the eigen-values $\lambda_I > \lambda_{II} > \lambda_{III}$. Note that $\mathbf{S_I}$ is the vector that fits the best the points of $\mathcal{S}$. Indeed, it minimizes the sum of distances from the points to the orthogonal projection on itself. Thus, $\mathbf{S_I}$ is the principal direction of the free-form surface $\mathcal{S}$. The covariance matrix $C$ of the surface $\mathcal{S}$ is 
-
-\begin{equation}
- C=\begin{pmatrix}
-        \var(S_x) & \cov(S_{x}S_y) & \cov(S_{x}S_z) \\
-        \cov(S_{x}S_y) & \var(S_y) & \cov(S_{y}S_z) \\
-        \cov(S_{x}S_z)& \cov(S_{y}S_z) & \var(S_z)
-    \end{pmatrix}
-    \label{eq:cov_mat}
-\end{equation}
-
-\hfill \begin{tabular}{rlcl}
- where & $\var(S_x)=\E(S_x^2) - \E(S_x)^2$ & and & $\cov(S_{x}S_y)=\E(S_xS_y) - \E(S_x)\E(S_y)$ \\
- ~     & $\var(S_y)=\E(S_y^2) - \E(S_y)^2$ & ~   & $\cov(S_{x}S_z)=\E(S_xS_z) - \E(S_x)\E(S_z)$ \\
- ~     & $\var(S_z)=\E(S_z^2) - \E(S_z)^2$ & ~   & $\cov(S_{y}S_z)=\E(S_xS_z) - \E(S_x)\E(S_z)$
-\end{tabular}
-
-In these expressions, $\E(X)$ is the mean of quantity $X$ over the surface. Using the $n$ sample points previously defined it is calculated as  a discrete sum $\E(X)=\frac{1}{n}\sum_{i=0}^n\,X$. Eigen-vectors are orthogonal because the covariance matrix is symmetric. Since the cutter must remain tangent to surface during machining, and surfaces are geometric varieties of dimension 2, eigen-vector $\mathbf{S_{II}}$ represents the direction along wich the surface is less extended, which justifies that the steepest slope direction is considered orthogonal to principal direction $\mathbf{S_I}$. The eigen-vector $\mathbf{S_{III}}$ is not considered since $\lambda_{III}$ is equal to zero for flat surfaces. In general, the smaller $\lambda_{III}$ is, the more the surface is flat.
-
-\subsubsection{Using eigen values ratio to approximate the width/height form-factor}
-
-It is worth noting that the eigen vectors $\mathbf{S_I}$ and $\mathbf{S_{II}}$ span the plane that fits the best the surface $\mathcal{S}$, again in terms of minimizing the sum of distances from points of $\mathcal{S}$ to their orthogonal projection on this plane. The eigen values $\lambda_I$ and $\lambda_{II}$ represents the variance of the projected points on $\mathbf{S_I}$ respectively $\mathbf{S_{II}}$. It is straightforward, for a continuous surface, that its projection on a vector is a continuous segment of length proportional to the standard deviation of the projected points. As a result, the width by height fraction of a free form surface could be approximated by the square root of eigen values fraction. Equation \ref{eq:form-factor_approx} gives the approximation of the form-factor parameter $\mu$ (defined previously for rectangular flat surfaces as the square root of width by height). This approximation has been verified for flat rectangular surfaces and appears to be exact in this case.
-
-\begin{equation}
- \tilde{\mu} = \sqrt[4]{\frac{\lambda_I}{\lambda_{II}}}
- \label{eq:form-factor_approx}
-\end{equation}
-
-Contrary to flat surfaces, the steepest slope of free form surfaces is not constant. A first approximation could be the mean of points slopes over the entier surface. In that case the approximating slope is given by equation \ref{eq:slope_app1}. A second approximation relying on PCA consists in using the slope of the plane spanned by eigen vectors $\mathbf{S_I}$ and $\mathbf{S_{II}}$, since its the plane that best fits the surface. Equation \ref{eq:slope_app2} gives the expression of the approximating slope as function of eigen vectors. Both approximations are exact for flat surfaces.
-
-\begin{equation}
- \tilde{s} = \mbox{E}(s)
- \label{eq:slope_app1}
-\end{equation}
-
-\begin{equation}
- \tilde{s} = \frac{\pi}{2} - \arccos{\left(\frac{\mathbf{S_I}\times\mathbf{S_{II}}}{\lVert\mathbf{S_I}\times\mathbf{S_{II}}\rVert}\cdot\mathbf{Z}\right)}
- \label{eq:slope_app2}
-\end{equation}
-
-In the same way, the steepest slope direction of a free form surface $\mathcal{S}$ is approximated either by the mean of steepest direction over the surface, or the steepest slope of the plane spanned by $\mathbf{S_I}$ and $\mathbf{S_{II}}$, which is the projection of $ \mathbf{S_I}\times\mathbf{S_{II}}$ on the horizontal plane $\left(\mathbf{X},\mathbf{Y}\right)$.
-
-\subsection{Practical application to free-form surfaces}
-
-After extending the definition of critical parameters, the procedure of prediciting the best cutter and machining direction for free-form surfaces is presented in following:
-
-\begin{enumerate}
- \item Define an isoparametric regular meshing over surface $\mathcal{S}$
- \item Calculate covariance matrix $C$ and normal vectors $n_i$ over the mesh
- \item Eigen-decomposition of $C$ to find $\lambda_I$, $\lambda_{II}$, $\mathbf{S_I}$, $\mathbf{S_{II}}$ and compute form factor $\tilde{\mu}$ 
- \item Using normal vectors to calculate the slope $\tilde{s}$ and the steepest slope direction (should be parallel to $\mathbf{S_{II}}$)
- \item Define characteristic size $H$
- \item Calculate critical parameters: $s_c(\tilde{\mu})$ using equation \ref{eq:sc}, or $\mu_c(\tilde{s})$ using equation \ref{eq:fc}
- \item Compare with critical parameters: if $s_c(\tilde{\mu}) < \tilde{s}$ or $\mu_c(\tilde{s}) < \tilde{\mu}$, then choose ball-end cutter along principal direction, otherwise choose toroidal cutter along steepest slope direction.
-\end{enumerate}
-
-In order to test the aforementioned approach, a benchmark with two test case free form surfaces is done. Both surfaces are chosen such as the principal direction is nearly orthogonal with the approximation of steepest slope direction, and discretised using a regular isoparametric $80\times80$ mesh. Machining times corresponding to toroidal cutter along steepest slope direction, and ball-end cutter along principal direction are compared and used to confirm the result predicted by critical parameters $\mu_c(\tilde{s})$ and $s_c(\tilde{\mu})$.
-
-\subsubsection{Test case 1}
-
-The first test case is a Bezier surface of $3\times3$ control points given in table \ref{tab:tile}. The surface is illustrated in figure \ref{fig:tile} where the axis $\mathbf{X}$, respectively $\mathbf{Y}$ and $\mathbf{Z}$ is represented by the red, respectively green and blue vectors.
-
-\begin{table}[ht]
- \centering
- \begin{tabular}{|c|c|c|c|c|c|c|c|c|}
-  \hline
-  point 0,0 & point 0,1 & point 0,2 & point 1,0 & point 1,1 & point 1,2 & point 2,0 & point 2,1 & point 2,2 \\
-  \hline
-  $\begin{matrix}
-   0.0 \\
-   -15.32 \\
-   -12.85
-  \end{matrix}$ & 
-  $\begin{matrix}
-   0.0 \\
-   -6.42 \\
-   -7.66
-  \end{matrix}$ &
-  $\begin{matrix}
-   0.0 \\
-   15.32 \\
-   12.85
-  \end{matrix}$ &
-  $\begin{matrix}
-   40.0 \\
-   -18.53 \\
-   -9.02
-  \end{matrix}$ & 
-  $\begin{matrix}
-   40.0 \\
-   -9.64 \\
-   11.49
-  \end{matrix}$ &
-  $\begin{matrix}
-   40.0 \\
-   12.10 \\
-   16.68
-  \end{matrix}$ &
-  $\begin{matrix}
-   80.0 \\
-   -28.17 \\
-   2.46
-  \end{matrix}$ &
-  $\begin{matrix}
-   80.0 \\
-   -22.49 \\
-   26.81
-  \end{matrix}$&
-  $\begin{matrix}
-   80.0 \\
-   2.46 \\
-   28.17
-  \end{matrix}$\\\hline
- \end{tabular}
- \caption{Cartesian coordinates of test surface 1 control points}
- \label{tab:tile}
-\end{table}
-
-\begin{figure}[ht]
- \centering
- \includegraphics[width=0.4\linewidth]{inclined_tile.png}
- \caption{Test surface 1 with its principal (purple) and steepest slope (black) directions}
- \label{fig:tile}
-\end{figure}
-
-The black vector shows the steepest slope direction while the purple one shows the principal direction. The approximate slope $\tilde{s}$ is equal to \unit{0.747}{\radian}=\unit{42.8}{\degree} when calculated as the mean of slopes over the mesh and equals \unit{0.739}{\radian}=\unit{42.34}{\degree} when calculated as the slope of the plane spanned by eigen vectors $\mathbf{S_I}$ and $\mathbf{S_{II}}$. The steepest slope direction (speepest slope vector projected in $(\mathbf{X},\mathbf{Y})$ plane) forms an angle with axis $\mathbf{X}$ equal to \unit{1.12}{\radian}=\unit{64.17}{\degree} using the first approximation and \unit{1.169}{\radian}=\unit{66.97}{\degree} using the second. The PCA performed on the surface enables the calculation of the form-factor: $\tilde{\mu} = 1.439$ and the principal direction defined by an angle of \unit{-0.17}{\radian}=\unit{-9.74}{\degree} with the axis $\mathbf{X}$. Results of machining along both directions are summarized in table \ref{tab:tile_result}. the numerical simulation of machining takes nearly \unit{3}{\second}. Figure \ref{fig:tile_mach} shows machining toolpaths in both cases.
-
-
-\begin{table}
- \centering
- \begin{tabular}{|c|c|c|}
- \hline
-   & machining time & toolpath length \\\hline
-  toroidal tool along steepest slope direction & \unit{91.3}{\second} & \unit{5606}{\milli\meter} \\\hline
-  ball-end tool along principal direction & \unit{79.7}{\second} & \unit{5687}{\milli\meter} \\\hline
- \end{tabular}
- \caption{machining times and toolpath lengths for test surface 1}
- \label{tab:tile_result}
-\end{table}
-
-\begin{figure}
- \centering
- \begin{subfigure}{0.4\textwidth}
-  \centering
-  \includegraphics[width=\linewidth]{inclinedtile_toric.png}
-  \caption{}
- \end{subfigure}
- \begin{subfigure}{0.4\textwidth}
-  \centering
-  \includegraphics[width=\linewidth]{inclinedtile_spheric.png}
-  \caption{}
- \end{subfigure}
- \caption{Machining of test case surface 1: (a) along the steepest slope direction using a toroidal cutter, (b) along the principal direction using a ball-end cutter}
- \label{fig:tile_mach}
-\end{figure}
-
-From the obtained results, one can notice the importance of taking account of the kinemtics of CNC machine. In fact, eventhough the toolpath length is slightely shorter for toroidal tool, the ball end tool presents a better machining time. Our approach is tested on this surface: The caracteristic size $H$ of the plane spanned by eigen-vectors can be deduced (see equation \ref{eq:h}) from the form-factor $\tilde{\mu} = 1.439$ and the size of the surface acording to one of the eigen-vectors $\mathbf{S_I}$ or $\mathbf{S_{II}}$. Knowing that $\tilde{s} = \unit{42.3}{\degree}$, the critical form-factor can be calculated using equation \ref{eq:fc} and is equal to $\mu_c(\tilde{s}) = 1.342$. Since $\tilde{\mu} > \mu_c$, our approach predicts that ball-end tool will present a better machining time, which corresponds to the numerical results. Consequently, the prediction is correct on this first test case.
-
-\begin{equation}
- H = \frac{\unit{80}{\milli\meter}}{\tilde{\mu}} = \unit{40}{\milli\meter}\times\tilde{\mu} = \unit{56.5}{\milli\meter}
- \label{eq:h}
-\end{equation}
-
-\subsubsection{Test case 2}
-
-The second test case is a Bezier surface of $4\times4$ control points given in table \ref{tab:choi}. This surface was previously used in \cite{keun_choi_tool_2007} for free form surfaces machining tests. The surface is illustrated in figure \ref{fig:choi}, with same colors as previous test case for axes $\mathbf{X}$, $\mathbf{Y}$ and $\mathbf{Z}$. Again, the steepest slope and principal directions are nearly orthogonal, which is important for testing the validity of the proposed approach when extended to free-form surfaces. The approximate slope $\tilde{s}$ is equal to \unit{0.412}{\radian}=\unit{23.06}{\degree} when calculated as the mean of slopes over the mesh and equals \unit{0.299}{\radian}=\unit{17.13}{\degree} when calculated as the slope of the plane spanned by eigen vectors $\mathbf{S_I}$ and $\mathbf{S_{II}}$ and the steepest slope direction is aligned with axis $\mathbf{X}$ using both approximations. Eigen-values are then used to calculate the form-factor: $\tilde{\mu} = 1.093$ and the principal direction is defined by an angle of \unit{1.57}{\radian}=\unit{90.0}{\degree} with the axis $\mathbf{X}$. Results of machining along both directions are summarized in table \ref{tab:choi_result}. The numerical simulation of machining takes nearly \unit{3}{\second}. Figure \ref{fig:choi_mach} shows machining toolpaths in both cases.
-
-\begin{table}[ht]
- \centering
- \begin{tabular}{|c|c|c|c|c|c|c|c|c|}
-  \hline
-  point 1 & point 2 & point 3 & point 4 & point 5 & point 6 & point 7 & point 8 \\
-  \hline
-  $\begin{matrix}
-   7.92 \\
-   0.0 \\
-   37.26
-  \end{matrix}$ & 
-  $\begin{matrix}
-   6.33 \\
-   20.4 \\
-   29.81
-  \end{matrix}$ &
-  $\begin{matrix}
-   6.33\\
-   40.8 \\
-   29.81
-  \end{matrix}$ &
-  $\begin{matrix}
-   7.92 \\
-   61.2 \\
-   37.26
-  \end{matrix}$ & 
-  $\begin{matrix}
-   23.72 \\
-   0.0 \\
-   26.11
-  \end{matrix}$ &
-  $\begin{matrix}
-   22.14 \\
-   20.4 \\
-   18.66
-  \end{matrix}$ &
-  $\begin{matrix}
-   22.14 \\
-   40.8 \\
-   18.66
-  \end{matrix}$ &
-  $\begin{matrix}
-   23.72 \\
-   61.2 \\
-   26.11
-  \end{matrix}$\\
-  \hline
-  point 9 & point 10 & point 11 & point 12 & point 13 & point 14 & point 15 & point 16 \\
-  \hline
-  $\begin{matrix}
-   42.70 \\
-   0.0 \\
-   29.87
-  \end{matrix}$ & 
-  $\begin{matrix}
-   41.12 \\
-   20.4 \\
-   22.42
-  \end{matrix}$ &
-  $\begin{matrix}
-   41.12 \\
-   40.8 \\
-   22.42
-  \end{matrix}$ &
-  $\begin{matrix}
-   42.70 \\
-   61.2 \\
-   29.87
-  \end{matrix}$ & 
-  $\begin{matrix}
-   56.02 \\
-   0.0 \\
-   19.25
-  \end{matrix}$ &
-  $\begin{matrix}
-   54.44 \\
-   20.4 \\
-   11.79
-  \end{matrix}$ &
-  $\begin{matrix}
-   54.44 \\
-   40.8 \\
-   11.79
-  \end{matrix}$ &
-  $\begin{matrix}
-   56.02 \\
-   61.2 \\
-   19.25
-  \end{matrix}$\\
-  \hline
- \end{tabular}
- \caption{Cartesian coordinates of test surface 2 control points}
- \label{tab:choi}
-\end{table}
-
-\begin{figure}[ht]
- \centering
- \includegraphics[width=0.4\linewidth]{inclined_choi.png}
- \caption{Test surface 2 with its principal (purple) and steepest slope (black) directions}
- \label{fig:choi}
-\end{figure}
-
-\begin{table} [ht]
- \centering
- \begin{tabular}{|c|c|c|}
- \hline
-   & machining time & toolpath length \\\hline
-  toroidal tool along steepest slope direction & \unit{71.8}{\second} & \unit{4725}{\milli\meter} \\\hline
-  ball-end tool along principal direction & \unit{76.8}{\second} & \unit{5184}{\milli\meter} \\\hline
- \end{tabular}
- \caption{machining times and toolpath lengths for test surface 2}
- \label{tab:choi_result}
-\end{table}
-
-\begin{figure}
- \centering
- \begin{subfigure}{0.4\textwidth}
-  \centering
-  \includegraphics[width=\linewidth]{inclinedchoi_toric.png}
-  \caption{}
- \end{subfigure}
- \begin{subfigure}{0.4\textwidth}
-  \centering
-  \includegraphics[width=\linewidth]{inclinedchoi_spheric.png}
-  \caption{}
- \end{subfigure}
- \caption{Machining of test case surface 2: (a) along the steepest slope direction using a toroidal cutter, (b) along the principal direction using a ball-end cutter}
- \label{fig:choi_mach}
-\end{figure}
-
-From the obtained results, one can notice the importance of taking account of the kinemtics of CNC machine. In fact, eventhough the toolpath length is slightely shorter for toroidal tool, the ball end tool presents a better machining time. Our approach is tested on this surface: The caracteristic size $H$ of the plane spanned by eigen-vectors is equal to \unit{55.8}{\milli\meter}. Knowing that $\tilde{s} = \unit{23.06}{\degree}$, the critical form-factor can be calculated using equation \ref{eq:fc} and is equal to $\mu_c(\tilde{s}) = 2.04$. Since $\tilde{\mu} < \mu_c$, our approach predicts that toroidal cutter will present a better machining time, which corresponds to the numerical results. Consequently, the prediction is correct on this second test case.
-
-\section{Discussion}\label{sec:discuss}
-The validity and limitations of the proposed approach are discussed in this section. The proposed procedure is fully efficient when machining directions ({\em i.e.} the steepest slope direction and the surface most extended direction) are close to perpendicular, otherwise the calculation of critical parameters loose its accuracy. Closer the machining directions are to the perpendicular, more accurate is the calculation of the critical parameters. This may appear like quite a limiting factor, but actually more the steepest slope and principal directions are close, more the toroidal tool should be privileged since it leads to larger step-over distances without increasing the number of paths. Therefore the proposed procedure is really useful and accurate for really problematic surfaces and less interesting for surfaces which machining directions and best cutter are obvious.
-
-The approach is analytically proved for flat rectangular surfaces. To do so few hypothesis where made:
-\begin{itemize}
-\item First, the $\frac{H}{\mu}$ ratio is considered great enough to ensure that paths machining time is calculated such that nominal feed rate is achieved without maximum acceleration. For the kinematic parameters values used in this paper, the lower bound is $\frac{H}{\mu}>\unit{7.6}{\milli\meter}$. This condition excludes very small surface and is acceptable in practice.
-\item Secondly, it was supposed that step-over distances (between two adjacent paths) are not long enough to achieve nominal feed rate. This is verified for both cutters since band width is inferior to $\unit{7.6}{\milli\meter}$. This condition depends on kinematic parameters values but also on cutter geometry and needs to be verified when the values change. In practice, the size of cutters used for finishing are small enough to consider this condition as verified.
-\item The last hypothesis concerns the calculation of critical slope $s_c$. It was supposed that $H>\unit{10}{\milli\meter}$ in order to ensure that equation \ref{eq:pt1} has only one real solution. Machining free-form surfaces, cases when most extended dimension is not than greater than $\unit{10}{\milli\meter}$ are very rare.
-\end{itemize}
-
-The proposed approach is then fairly extended to free-form surfaces. Actually, the approach is more accurate for surfaces with slowly varying normal vectors, and thus slowly varying steepest slope directions. On the other side, the approach is less accurate when the steepest slope direction is highly varying, especially when parallel planes strategy is used. Indeed parallel planes strategy implies that step-over distance is determined by the worst interpolation point contrary to iso-scallop strategy and range for calculated step-over distances is bigger when surface normals vary a lot.
-
-For free-form surfaces, there are two ways, as mentionned before, to calculate the approximate slope $\tilde{s}$ that might give different values. Again, the difference here is bigger when the normal vector is highly varying.
-
-The proposed approach relies strongly on the kinematic parameters of the NC machining: $J_{max}$, $A_{max}$ and the nominal feed rate $V$. Therefore, the hypotheses concerning machining time calculation in section \ref{sec:kinematics} need to be checked for different values of kinematic parameters but the procedure remains the same. 
-
-Other point that worths to be noted is that the scallop height tolerance $s_h$ does not seem to have a noteworthy influence on critical parameters. Indeed, the same evolution curves of critical parameters $s_c(\mu)$ and $\mu_c(s)$ (see figures \ref{fig:sc} and  \ref{fig:fc}) were found for $s_h=\unit{0.1}{\milli\meter}$.
-
-\section{Conclusion and perspectives}
-
-A new method for selecting between ball-end and toroidal cutter is presented in this paper. The method is first proved for flat surfaces and then extended to freeform surfaces using principal component analysis. It is based on identifiying two caracteristic machining directions: the steepest slope direction and the principal direction, the first one promoting toroidal tool while the second promotes ball-end tool. The approach provided best results when these two directions are antagonist ({\em} i.e. perpendicular), but when they are not, the cutter type choice is generally obvious. The proposed method is also providing better results when the normal vector to the surface is varying slowly, but still can provide a good hint for complicated free-form surfaces.
-
-This work is only a first approach to cutter type selection problem. Further works may include more accurate theoretical evaluation of number of paths included into a toolpath, better free-form surfaces parameters approximations, maybe related to machining strategy, and a full analysis of nominal feed speed influence on critical parameters.
-
-\bibliographystyle{abbrv}
-\bibliography{biblioA0.bib}
-
-\end{document}
diff --git a/Publis/biblioA0.bib b/Publis/biblioA0.bib
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 79101e5..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,495 +0,0 @@
-
-@article{pessoles_modelling_2012,
-       title = {Modelling and optimising the passage of tangency discontinuities in {NC} linear paths},
-       volume = {58},
-       issn = {0268-3768},
-       doi = {10.1007/s00170-011-3426-z},
-       abstract = {CAM programs can generate cutting tool paths to be used by machining centres. Experience shows that CAM programmed feed rates are rarely achieved in practice during machining, especially when finishing free-form surfaces. These slower feed rates are due to the machines' kinematic capabilities and behaviour of the numerical control (NC). To improve control over the machining process, applications need to be developed to predict the kinematic behaviour of the machines, taking the mechanical characteristics of the axes and NC capacities into account. Various models to simulate tool paths in linear and circular interpolation have been developed and are available in the literature. The present publication will first focus on the use of the polynomial model to simulate the behaviour of the machine when passing through transitions between programmed blocks with tangency discontinuities. Additional features are proposed to ensure enhancement of the match between the model and the machine's behaviour. Analysis of machine behaviour shows that NCs do not always allow the axes to reach maximum performance levels, with an attendant loss in productivity. The present article proposes an optimisation procedure allowing control laws to be defined to reduce time spent in the transition. The contributions made by these optimised control laws are then evaluated, while impediments to their implementation are also considered.},
-       language = {English},
-       number = {5-8},
-       journal = {International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology},
-       author = {Pessoles, Xavier and Redonnet, Jean-Max and Segonds, Stephane and Mousseigne, Michel},
-       month = jan,
-       year = {2012},
-       note = {WOS:000300090100018},
-       keywords = {Constrained non-linear optimisation, curves, Discontinuities between blocks, interpolation scheme, Linear interpolation, Machine tool, machine-tools, nc, optimization, Polynomial transition, speed, time, Tool-path},
-       pages = {631--642}
-}
-
-@article{bedi_toroidal_1997,
-       title = {Toroidal versus ball nose and flat bottom end mills},
-       volume = {13},
-       issn = {0268-3768, 1433-3015},
-       url = {http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF01178252},
-       doi = {10.1007/BF01178252},
-       abstract = {This paper compares the surface roughness along and across the feed directions produced by toroidal, ball nose, and flat bottom end mills. The study is conducted numerically and by cutting tests of aluminium. The results show that the toroidal cutter inherits the merits of the other two cutters; it produces small scallops across the feed direction, and low roughness along the feed direction.},
-       language = {en},
-       number = {5},
-       urldate = {2013-09-26},
-       journal = {The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology},
-       author = {Bedi, Dr S. and Ismail, F. and Mahjoob, M. J. and Chen, Y.},
-       month = may,
-       year = {1997},
-       keywords = {5-axis machining, Ball end mills, Computer-Aided Engineering (CAD, CAE) and Design, Feed mark, Flat end mills, Industrial and Production Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Production/Logistics, Scallop height estimation, Toroidal end mill},
-       pages = {326--332},
-       file = {Full Text PDF:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/P8QIQDK7/Bedi et al. - 1997 - Toroidal versus ball nose and flat bottom end mill.pdf:application/pdf}
-}
-
-@article{kim_effect_1994,
-       title = {Effect of cutter mark on surface roughness and scallop height in sculptured surface machining},
-       volume = {26},
-       number = {3},
-       journal = {Computer-Aided Design},
-       author = {Kim, B.H. and Chu, C.N.},
-       month = mar,
-       year = {1994},
-       pages = {179--188}
-}
-
-@article{sheltami_swept_1998,
-       title = {Swept volumes of toroidal cutters using generating curves},
-       volume = {38},
-       number = {7},
-       journal = {International Journal of Machine Tools and Manufacture},
-       author = {Sheltami, Khalid and Bedi, Sanjeev and Ismail, Fathy},
-       month = jul,
-       year = {1998},
-       pages = {855--870}
-}
-
-@article{pessoles_kinematic_2010,
-       title = {Kinematic modelling of a 3-axis {NC} machine tool in linear and circular interpolation},
-       volume = {47},
-       issn = {0268-3768},
-       doi = {10.1007/s00170-009-2236-z},
-       number = {5-8, SI},
-       journal = {The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology},
-       author = {Pessoles, Xavier and Landon, Yann and Rubio, Walter},
-       month = mar,
-       year = {2010},
-       pages = {639--655}
-}
-
-@article{cho_five-axis_1993,
-       title = {Five-axis {CNC} milling for effective machining of sculptured surfaces},
-       volume = {31},
-       number = {11},
-       journal = {International Journal of Production Research},
-       author = {Cho, H.{\textasciitilde}D. and Jun, Y.{\textasciitilde}T. and Yang, M.{\textasciitilde}Y.},
-       year = {1993},
-       pages = {2559--2573}
-}
-
-@article{djebali_milling_2015,
-       title = {Milling plan optimization with an emergent problem solving approach},
-       volume = {87},
-       issn = {0360-8352},
-       url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S036083521500248X},
-       doi = {10.1016/j.cie.2015.05.025},
-       abstract = {With elaboration of products having the more complex design and good quality, minimize machining time becomes very important. The machining time is assumed, by hypothesis, to be proportional to the paths length crossed by the tool on the surface. The path length depends on the feed direction and the surface topology. To get an optimal feed direction at all points of surface, this study concerns machining with zones of the free-form surfaces on a 3-axis machine tool. In each zone, the variation of the steepest slope direction is lower, total path length is minimized and the feed direction is near the optimal feed direction. To resolve this problem, the Adaptive Multi-Agent System approach is used. Furthermore, a penalty reflecting the displacement of the tool from a zone to another one is taken into account. After several simulations and comparisons with the machining in one zone (what is being done at present), the results obtained present a significant saving about 22\%.},
-       urldate = {2019-05-24},
-       journal = {Computers \& Industrial Engineering},
-       author = {Djebali, Sonia and Perles, Alexandre and Lemouzy, Sylvain and Segonds, Stephane and Rubio, Walter and Redonnet, Jean-Max},
-       month = sep,
-       year = {2015},
-       keywords = {Free-form surface, Machining zones, Emergent problem solving, Mutli-agent algorithm, Path length tool},
-       pages = {506--517},
-       file = {ScienceDirect Full Text PDF:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/KM3AD66I/Djebali et al. - 2015 - Milling plan optimization with an emergent problem.pdf:application/pdf;ScienceDirect Snapshot:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/UJSXYLXU/S036083521500248X.html:text/html}
-}
-
-@article{lasemi_recent_2010,
-       title = {Recent development in {CNC} machining of freeform surfaces: {A} state-of-the-art review},
-       volume = {42},
-       issn = {0010-4485},
-       shorttitle = {Recent development in {CNC} machining of freeform surfaces},
-       url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0010448510000631},
-       doi = {10.1016/j.cad.2010.04.002},
-       abstract = {Freeform surfaces, also called sculptured surfaces, have been widely used in various engineering applications. Freeform surfaces are primarily manufactured by CNC machining, especially 5-axis CNC machining. Various methodologies and computer tools have been developed in the past to improve efficiency and quality of freeform surface machining. This paper aims at providing a state-of-the-art review on recent research development in CNC machining of freeform surfaces. This review primarily focuses on three aspects in freeform surface machining: tool path generation, tool orientation identification, and tool geometry selection. For each aspect, first concepts, requirements and fundamental research methods are briefly introduced. The major research methodologies developed in the past decade in each aspect are presented with details. Problems and future research directions are also discussed.},
-       number = {7},
-       urldate = {2019-05-24},
-       journal = {Computer-Aided Design},
-       author = {Lasemi, Ali and Xue, Deyi and Gu, Peihua},
-       month = jul,
-       year = {2010},
-       keywords = {5-axis CNC machining, Freeform surface, Tool orientation, Tool parameters, Tool path},
-       pages = {641--654},
-       file = {ScienceDirect Full Text PDF:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/A9WRTWT6/Lasemi et al. - 2010 - Recent development in CNC machining of freeform su.pdf:application/pdf;ScienceDirect Snapshot:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/8Y8BX2TM/S0010448510000631.html:text/html}
-}
-
-@article{redonnet_study_2013,
-       title = {Study of the effective cutter radius for end milling of free-form surfaces using a torus milling cutter},
-       volume = {45},
-       issn = {0010-4485},
-       url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0010448513000389},
-       doi = {10.1016/j.cad.2013.03.002},
-       abstract = {When end milling free-form surfaces using a torus milling cutter, the notion of cutter effective radius is often used to address the procedure for removal of material from a purely geometrical perspective. Using an original analytical approach, the present study establishes a relation enabling the value of this effective radius to be easily computed. The limits of validity of this relation are then discussed and precisely defined. By way of an illustration, an example of how this relation can be used to generate a numerical tool for analysis of the possibilities for machining free-form surfaces on multi-axis machine-tools is also presented.},
-       number = {6},
-       urldate = {2019-05-24},
-       journal = {Computer-Aided Design},
-       author = {Redonnet, Jean-Max and Djebali, Sonia and Segonds, Stéphane and Senatore, Johanna and Rubio, Walter},
-       month = jun,
-       year = {2013},
-       keywords = {CNC machine-tool, Effective tool radius, End-mill, Free-form surface, Swept curve, Toroidal cutter},
-       pages = {951--962},
-       file = {ScienceDirect Full Text PDF:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/PYEMPQ83/Redonnet et al. - 2013 - Study of the effective cutter radius for end milli.pdf:application/pdf;ScienceDirect Snapshot:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/NWLDR3UA/S0010448513000389.html:text/html}
-}
-
-@article{roman_three-half_2006,
-       title = {Three-half and half-axis patch-by-patch {NC} machining of sculptured surfaces},
-       volume = {29},
-       issn = {1433-3015},
-       url = {https://doi.org/10.1007/s00170-005-2553-9},
-       doi = {10.1007/s00170-005-2553-9},
-       abstract = {Despite the inbuilt advantages offered by five-axis machining, the manufacturing industry has not widely adopted this technology due to the high cost of machines and insufficient support from CAD/CAM systems. Companies are used to three-axis machining and their shop floors are not yet ready for five-axis machining in terms of training and programming. The objective of this research is to develop and implement a machining technique that uses the simplicity of three-axis tool positioning and the flexibility of five-axis tool orientation, to machine sculptured surfaces. This technique, 31212312123{\textbackslash}frac\{1\}\{2\}{\textbackslash}frac\{1\}\{2\}-axis, divides a sculptured surface into patches and then machines each patch using a fixed tool orientation. This paper presents the surface partitioning scheme and the method of selecting an optimum number of sub-divisions along with actual machining experiments. For the example surface utilized in this study, the proposed hybrid method led to shorter machining time compared to traditional three-axis machining and comparable to simultaneous five-axis machining .},
-       language = {en},
-       number = {5},
-       urldate = {2019-05-24},
-       journal = {The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology},
-       author = {Roman, Armando and Bedi, S. and Ismail, F.},
-       month = jun,
-       year = {2006},
-       keywords = {Five-axis machining, 3+2-axis machining, Surface partitioning
-sculptured surfaces},
-       pages = {524--531},
-       file = {Springer Full Text PDF:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/BGQCEIVS/Roman et al. - 2006 - Three-half and half-axis patch-by-patch NC machini.pdf:application/pdf}
-}
-
-@article{djebali_using_2015,
-       title = {Using the global optimisation methods to minimise the machining path length of the free-form surfaces in three-axis milling},
-       volume = {53},
-       issn = {0020-7543},
-       url = {https://doi.org/10.1080/00207543.2015.1029648},
-       doi = {10.1080/00207543.2015.1029648},
-       abstract = {During the machining of free-form surfaces using three-axis numerically controlled machine (NC), several parameters are chosen arbitrary and one of the most important is the feed motion direction. The main objective of this study is to minimise the machining time of complex surfaces while respecting a scallop height criteria. The analytical expression of the machining time is not known and by hypothesis, it is assumed to be proportional to the path length crossed by the cutting tool. This path length depends on the feed direction. To have an optimal feed direction at any point, the surface is divided into zones with low variation of the steepest slope direction. The optimization problem was formulated aiming at minimizing the global path length. Furthermore, a penalty reflecting the time loss due to the movement of the tool from one zone to another one is taken into account. Several heuristics are used to resolve this problem: Clarke and Wrights, Greedy randomized adaptive search procedure, Tabu search and Nearest neighbour search. An example illustrates our work by applying the different heuristics on a test surface. After simulations, the results obtained present a significant saving of paths length of 24\% compared to the machining in one zone.},
-       number = {17},
-       urldate = {2019-05-24},
-       journal = {International Journal of Production Research},
-       author = {Djebali, S. and Segonds, S. and Redonnet, J. M. and Rubio, W.},
-       month = sep,
-       year = {2015},
-       keywords = {free-form surface, global optimisation, machining zones, path length tool, three-axis milling},
-       pages = {5296--5309},
-       file = {Djebali et al. - 2015 - Using the global optimisation methods to minimise .pdf:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/5BDRCBX9/Djebali et al. - 2015 - Using the global optimisation methods to minimise .pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/73LJ49N3/00207543.2015.html:text/html}
-}
-
-@article{mann_generalization_2002,
-       title = {Generalization of the imprint method to general surfaces of revolution for {NC} machining},
-       volume = {34},
-       issn = {0010-4485},
-       url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0010448501001038},
-       doi = {10.1016/S0010-4485(01)00103-8},
-       abstract = {This paper presents a method of determining the shape of the surface swept by a generalized milling tool that follows a 5-axis tool path for machining curved surfaces. The method is a generalization of an earlier technique for toroidal tools that is based on identifying grazing points on the tool surface. We present a new proof that the points constructed by this earlier method are in fact grazing points, and we show that this previous method can be used to construct grazing points on (and only on) the sphere, the cone, and the torus. We then present a more general method that can compute grazing points on a general surface of revolution. The advantage of both methods is that they use simple, geometric formulas to compute grazing points.},
-       number = {5},
-       urldate = {2019-06-04},
-       journal = {Computer-Aided Design},
-       author = {Mann, Stephen and Bedi, Sanjeev},
-       month = apr,
-       year = {2002},
-       keywords = {Tool path verification, 5-Axis machining, Grazing curves},
-       pages = {373--378},
-       file = {ScienceDirect Full Text PDF:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/DXUEL5BU/Mann et Bedi - 2002 - Generalization of the imprint method to general su.pdf:application/pdf;ScienceDirect Snapshot:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/8EDT66EW/S0010448501001038.html:text/html}
-}
-
-@article{roth_surface_2001,
-       title = {Surface swept by a toroidal cutter during 5-axis machining},
-       volume = {33},
-       issn = {0010-4485},
-       url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0010448500000634},
-       doi = {10.1016/S0010-4485(00)00063-4},
-       abstract = {This paper presents a method of determining the shape of the surface swept by a tool that follows a 5-axis tool path for machining curved surfaces. The method consists of discretising the tool into pseudo-inserts and identifying imprint points using a modified principle of silhouettes. An imprint point exists for each pseudo-insert and the piecewise linear curve connecting them forms an imprint curve for one tool position. A collection of imprint curves is joined to approximate the swept surface. This method is simple to implement and executes rapidly. The method has been verified by comparing predicted results of a 3-axis tool path with analytical results and predicted results of a 5-axis tool path with measurements of a part made with the same tool path.},
-       number = {1},
-       urldate = {2019-06-04},
-       journal = {Computer-Aided Design},
-       author = {Roth, D. and Bedi, S. and Ismail, F. and Mann, S.},
-       month = jan,
-       year = {2001},
-       keywords = {5-axis machining, Imprint curves, Tool path verification},
-       pages = {57--63},
-       file = {ScienceDirect Full Text PDF:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/56LZ9NFR/Roth et al. - 2001 - Surface swept by a toroidal cutter during 5-axis m.pdf:application/pdf;ScienceDirect Snapshot:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/YM2KSCW5/S0010448500000634.html:text/html}
-}
-
-@article{wang_efficiency_1987,
-       title = {On the {Efficiency} of {NC} {Tool} {Path} {Planning} for {Face} {Milling} {Operations}},
-       volume = {109},
-       issn = {0022-0817},
-       url = {https://manufacturingscience.asmedigitalcollection.asme.org/article.aspx?articleid=1446972},
-       doi = {10.1115/1.3187141},
-       number = {4},
-       urldate = {2019-06-04},
-       journal = {Journal of Engineering for Industry},
-       author = {Wang, H. and Chang, H. and Wysk, R. A. and Chandawarkar, A.},
-       month = nov,
-       year = {1987},
-       pages = {370--376},
-       file = {Snapshot:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/J3AIPNH6/article.html:text/html;Wang et al. - 1987 - On the Efficiency of NC Tool Path Planning for Fac.pdf:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/K7C65HZB/Wang et al. - 1987 - On the Efficiency of NC Tool Path Planning for Fac.pdf:application/pdf}
-}
-
-@article{chiou_machining_2002,
-       title = {A machining potential field approach to tool path generation for multi-axis sculptured surface machining},
-       volume = {34},
-       issn = {0010-4485},
-       url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0010448501001026},
-       doi = {10.1016/S0010-4485(01)00102-6},
-       abstract = {This paper presents a machining potential field (MPF) method to generate tool paths for multi-axis sculptured surface machining. A machining potential field is constructed by considering both the part geometry and the cutter geometry to represent the machining-oriented information on the part surface for machining planning. The largest feasible machining strip width and the optimal cutting direction at a surface point can be found on the constructed machining potential field. The tool paths can be generated by following the optimal cutting direction. Compared to the traditional iso-parametric and iso-planar path generation methods, the generated MPF multi-axis tool paths can achieve better surface finish with shorter machining time. Feasible cutter sizes and cutter orientations can also be determined by using the MPF method. The developed techniques can be used to automate the multi-axis tool path generation and to improve the machining efficiency of sculptured surface machining.},
-       number = {5},
-       urldate = {2019-06-04},
-       journal = {Computer-Aided Design},
-       author = {Chiou, Chuang-Jang and Lee, Yuan-Shin},
-       month = apr,
-       year = {2002},
-       keywords = {Tool path generation, 5-Axis CNC machining, CAD/CAM, Sculptured surface machining},
-       pages = {357--371},
-       file = {ScienceDirect Full Text PDF:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/7T8M7D6X/Chiou et Lee - 2002 - A machining potential field approach to tool path .pdf:application/pdf;ScienceDirect Snapshot:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/5TXBDFNB/S0010448501001026.html:text/html}
-}
-
-@article{barnhill_surface/surface_1987,
-       series = {Topics in {CAGD}},
-       title = {Surface/surface intersection},
-       volume = {4},
-       issn = {0167-8396},
-       url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0167839687900203},
-       doi = {10.1016/0167-8396(87)90020-3},
-       abstract = {Finding the intersection of two surfaces is important for many Computer Aided Design tasks concerned with surface modeling. An adaptive algorithm is developed for finding the intersection curve(s) of pairs of rectangular parametric patches which are continuously differentiable. The balance between robustness and efficiency of the algorithm is controlled by a set of tolerances. A suite of examples concludes the paper.},
-       number = {1},
-       urldate = {2019-06-17},
-       journal = {Computer Aided Geometric Design},
-       author = {Barnhill, R. E. and Farin, G. and Jordan, M. and Piper, B. R.},
-       month = jul,
-       year = {1987},
-       keywords = {geometry, intersection, parametric patches, Surfaces},
-       pages = {3--16},
-       file = {ScienceDirect Full Text PDF:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/ADQDLY9E/Barnhill et al. - 1987 - Surfacesurface intersection.pdf:application/pdf;ScienceDirect Snapshot:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/2B7988DR/0167839687900203.html:text/html}
-}
-
-@article{warkentin_five-axis_1996,
-       title = {Five-axis milling of spherical surfaces},
-       volume = {36},
-       issn = {0890-6955},
-       url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/089069559598763W},
-       doi = {10.1016/0890-6955(95)98763-W},
-       abstract = {A new five-axis technique for machining of spherical surfaces with a radiused or flat bottom end mill is presented. The tool path generated by the proposed technique produces scallop free surfaces at a fraction of the time required by conventional milling using a ball nose end mill. The proposed method was verified experimentally on a wrist type and on a tilt-rotary table type five-axis milling machine.},
-       number = {2},
-       urldate = {2019-06-19},
-       journal = {International Journal of Machine Tools and Manufacture},
-       author = {Warkentin, A. and Bedi, S. and Ismail, F.},
-       month = feb,
-       year = {1996},
-       pages = {229--243},
-       file = {ScienceDirect Snapshot:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/3HSUBJ7Z/089069559598763W.html:text/html}
-}
-
-@article{vickers_ball-mills_1989,
-       title = {Ball-{Mills} {Versus} {End}-{Mills} for {Curved} {Surface} {Machining}},
-       volume = {111},
-       issn = {1087-1357},
-       url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1115/1.3188728},
-       doi = {10.1115/1.3188728},
-       abstract = {The use of end-mills for machining low curvature surfaces is examined in relation to the more popular ball-mills. End-mills are shown to give a better match to the required surface geometry and hence reduce the number of surface passes required. They also have a much better efficiency of material removal and longer tool life. It is shown that the use of end-mills for curved surface work can typically reduce the overall cutting time by a factor of twenty-four.},
-       number = {1},
-       urldate = {2019-06-19},
-       journal = {Journal of Engineering for Industry},
-       author = {Vickers, G. W. and Quan, K. W.},
-       month = feb,
-       year = {1989},
-       pages = {22--26},
-       file = {Vickers et Quan - 1989 - Ball-Mills Versus End-Mills for Curved Surface Mac.pdf:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/CW5MNZDI/Vickers et Quan - 1989 - Ball-Mills Versus End-Mills for Curved Surface Mac.pdf:application/pdf}
-}
-
-@phdthesis{redonnet_etude_1999,
-       type = {thesis},
-       title = {Etude globale du positionnement d'un outil pour l'usinage de surfaces gauches sur machines cinq axes et generation de trajectoires},
-       url = {http://www.theses.fr/1999TOU30008},
-       abstract = {Cette these a pour objet la definition de procedures destinees a ameliorer les techniques d'usinage des surfaces gauches sur machine-outil a commande numerique 5 axes. L'objectif est donc de mettre au point des algorithmes permettant d'obtenir le meilleur compromis entre precision de la surface usinee et productivite. Les criteres retenus sont donc la precision de la surface usinee, le temps d'usinage et le temps de calcul. Le premier chapitre presente une etude bibliographique commentee des technologies existantes. Une analyse detaillee des differentes procedures concernant les technologies d'usinage en roulant, d'usinage en bout et les problemes lies a la visibilite des surfaces permet d'orienter les axes de recherche a developper. Dans le deuxieme chapitre une nouvelle methodologie pour l'usinage en roulant des surfaces gauches est proposee. Cette methodologie est basee sur un positionnement ameliore d'un outil cylindrique ou conique pour l'usinage des surfaces reglees et sur une procedure de determination de l'outil optimal. Ce nouveau positionnement permet notamment de reduire considerablement l'interference qui peut survenir des lors que la surface n'est pas developpable. Le troisieme et dernier chapitre est consacre a l'etude de l'usinage en bout. Diverses methodes pour le calcul de la hauteur de crete sont presentees dans un premier temps. Des procedures d'optimisation du positionnement de l'outil sur une surface gauche pour les phases d'ebauche et de finition sont ensuite proposees. Ces nouvelles procedures de positionnement de l'outil permettent d'obtenir le meilleur compromis entre precision de la surface usinee et temps de calcul. La mise en place de ces differents algorithmes permet la definition d'une strategie globale d'usinage en bout des surfaces gauches. Tous les developpements presentes ont etes mis au point dans l'optique d'une implementation dans un logiciel de type cfao.},
-       urldate = {2019-06-19},
-       school = {Toulouse 3},
-       author = {Redonnet, Jean-Max},
-       month = jan,
-       year = {1999},
-       keywords = {Sciences appliquées},
-       file = {Snapshot:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/INZCQMRA/1999TOU30008.html:text/html}
-}
-
-@article{griffiths_toolpath_1994,
-       title = {Toolpath based on {Hilbert}'s curve},
-       volume = {26},
-       issn = {0010-4485},
-       url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0010448594900981},
-       doi = {10.1016/0010-4485(94)90098-1},
-       abstract = {An algorithm for generating a toolpath for a milling machine is described. The approach to its design was interdisciplinary. The algorithm contains ideas from computer graphics and mathematics, rather than mechanical engineering alone. An artefact described by any set of curved surfaces is carved out of a workpiece in two stages. Horizontal slices are removed to reveal the roughly cut artefact, and a final pass cuts the artefact to within a preset tolerance. The toolpath might seem to be needlessly convoluted, but it has substantial advantages over less sophisticated paths. Its local complexity adapts automatically to the local complexity of the artefact, so that more attention is concentrated on those parts of the artefact which require it. At the roughing out stage, the path efficiently skips over completely worked areas without retracing them with each new horizontal slice. The path minimizes the amount of tool movement which does not cut material, and minimizes the number of occassions on which the tool reenters the material. A prototype system has been developed to demonstrate that the new approach is viable.},
-       number = {11},
-       urldate = {2019-06-20},
-       journal = {Computer-Aided Design},
-       author = {Griffiths, J. G.},
-       month = nov,
-       year = {1994},
-       keywords = {cutters, machining, toolpaths},
-       pages = {839--844},
-       file = {ScienceDirect Snapshot:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/HD45LKAL/0010448594900981.html:text/html}
-}
-
-@article{keun_choi_tool_2007,
-       title = {Tool path generation and {3D} tolerance analysis for free-form surfaces},
-       volume = {47},
-       doi = {10.1016/j.ijmachtools.2006.04.014},
-       abstract = {This dissertation focuses on developing algorithms that generate tool paths for free-form surfaces based on accuracy of desired manufactured part. A manufacturing part is represented by mathematical curves and surfaces. Using the mathematical representation of the manufacturing part, we generate reliable and near optimal tool paths as well as cutter location (CL) data file for postprocessing. This algorithm includes two components. First is the forward-step function which determines maximum distance called forward- step between two cutter contact (CC) points with given tolerance. This function is independent of the surface type and is applicable to all continuous parametric surfaces that are twice differentiable. The second component is the side-step function which determines maximum distance called side-step between two adjacent tool paths with a given scallop height. This algorithm reduces manufacturing and computing time as well as the CC points while keeping the given tolerance and scallop height in the tool paths. Several parts, for which the CC points are generated using the proposed algorithm, are machined using a three axes milling machine. As part of the validation process, the tool paths generated during machining are analyzed to compare the machined part and the desired part.},
-       journal = {International Journal of Machine Tools and Manufacture},
-       author = {Keun Choi, Young},
-       month = mar,
-       year = {2007},
-       file = {Keun Choi - 2007 - Tool path generation and 3D tolerance analysis for.pdf:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/RTN87EJW/Keun Choi - 2007 - Tool path generation and 3D tolerance analysis for.pdf:application/pdf}
-}
-
-@article{park_tool-path_2000,
-       title = {Tool-path planning for direction-parallel area milling},
-       volume = {32},
-       issn = {0010-4485},
-       url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0010448599000809},
-       doi = {10.1016/S0010-4485(99)00080-9},
-       abstract = {Presented in the paper is a tool-path planning algorithm for direction-parallel area milling consisting of three modules: (1) finding the optimal inclination; (2) calculating and storing tool-path elements; and (3) tool-path linking. For the optimal inclination, we suggest an algorithm that selects an inclination by reflecting the shape of the machining area as well as the tool-path interval. We make use of the concept of a monotone chain and the plane-sweep paradigm to calculate the tool-path elements. The concept of a monotone chain brings clarity and tight-time complexity to the proposed algorithm. The tool-path linking problem is modeled as a TPE-Net (tool-path element net) traversing problem. For the two direction-parallel milling topologies, one-way and zigzag, tool-path linking algorithms are proposed. Empirical tests show that the proposed algorithm fulfils its requirements.},
-       number = {1},
-       urldate = {2019-07-11},
-       journal = {Computer-Aided Design},
-       author = {Park, S. C. and Choi, B. K.},
-       month = jan,
-       year = {2000},
-       keywords = {Direction-parallel area milling, One-way, Tool-path planning, Zigzag},
-       pages = {17--25},
-       file = {ScienceDirect Snapshot:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/AQMPET9J/S0010448599000809.html:text/html}
-}
-
-@article{park_tool-path_2003,
-       title = {Tool-path generation for {Z}-constant contour machining},
-       volume = {35},
-       issn = {0010-4485},
-       url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0010448501001737},
-       doi = {10.1016/S0010-4485(01)00173-7},
-       abstract = {For the Z-constant contour machining, a tool-path generation procedure is presented. The suggested procedure consists of two parts; (1) calculating the contours (tool-path-elements) by slicing the CL-surface with horizontal planes and (2) generating a tool-path by linking the contours. For the slicing algorithm, two algorithms are suggested, one is to slice a triangular mesh and the other is for a Z-map model. The second part, the linking problem, is approached from the technological requirements, such as considering the machining constraints among the tool-path-elements, minimizing the tool-path length and reflecting the oneway/zigzag linking options. To simplify the linking problem, we develop a data structure, called a TPE-net, providing information on the machining constraints among the tool-path-elements. By making use of the TPE-net, the tool-path linking problem becomes a touring problem so that every node has been traversed.},
-       number = {1},
-       urldate = {2019-07-11},
-       journal = {Computer-Aided Design},
-       author = {Park, Sang C.},
-       month = jan,
-       year = {2003},
-       keywords = {-map, Contour, Linking, Slicing, Tool-path generation, Triangular mesh},
-       pages = {27--36},
-       file = {ScienceDirect Snapshot:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/PLG96KLP/S0010448501001737.html:text/html}
-}
-
-@article{lazoglu_tool_2009,
-       title = {Tool path optimization for free form surface machining},
-       volume = {58},
-       issn = {0007-8506},
-       url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0007850609000511},
-       doi = {10.1016/j.cirp.2009.03.054},
-       abstract = {This article presents a novel approach to generate optimized tool paths for free form surfaces that are commonly used in automotive, aerospace, biomedical, home appliance manufacturing and die/mold industries. The developed tool path optimization approach can handle various objectives under multiple constraints. Due to anisotropic geometry of free form surfaces, tool paths become one of the most critical factors for determining cutting forces. Here, the concept of force-minimal tool path generation is introduced and demonstrated for free form surfaces. Nowadays, process planning engineers must select the tool paths only from a set of ordinary tool paths available in CAM systems. These standard tool paths available in CAM systems are generated based on geometric computations only, not considering mechanics of processes, and most often these paths are away being optimum for free form surfaces. Here, a new methodology is introduced the first time for generating the tool paths based on process mechanics for globally minimizing the cutting forces for any given free form surface.},
-       number = {1},
-       urldate = {2019-07-11},
-       journal = {CIRP Annals},
-       author = {Lazoglu, I. and Manav, C. and Murtezaoglu, Y.},
-       month = jan,
-       year = {2009},
-       keywords = {Milling, Computer aided manufacturing (CAM), Simulation},
-       pages = {101--104},
-       file = {Lazoglu et al. - 2009 - Tool path optimization for free form surface machi.pdf:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/IXWLRKH6/Lazoglu et al. - 2009 - Tool path optimization for free form surface machi.pdf:application/pdf;ScienceDirect Snapshot:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/KWIMVY8U/S0007850609000511.html:text/html}
-}
-
-@article{makhanov_optimization_2007,
-       series = {Applied {Scientific} {Computing}: {Advanced} {Grid} {Generation}, {Approximation} and {Simulation}},
-       title = {Optimization and correction of the tool path of the five-axis milling machine: {Part} 1. {Spatial} optimization},
-       volume = {75},
-       issn = {0378-4754},
-       shorttitle = {Optimization and correction of the tool path of the five-axis milling machine},
-       url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378475406003375},
-       doi = {10.1016/j.matcom.2006.12.009},
-       abstract = {We introduce three algorithms for optimization of a tool path of a numerically controlled five-axis milling machine. The unifying idea is a flexible geometric structure which adapts itself to a certain cost function defined on the required part surface. Algorithm 1 is based on the variational grid generation, Algorithm 2 is based on a new modification of the space filling curves techniques. Algorithm 3 is based on construction of vector fields composed of optimal cutting directions. The algorithms verified by numerical experiments as well as by practical machining display a priority with the reference to the standard methods.},
-       number = {5},
-       urldate = {2019-07-11},
-       journal = {Mathematics and Computers in Simulation},
-       author = {Makhanov, Stanislav},
-       month = sep,
-       year = {2007},
-       keywords = {CAD/CAM, Optimization, Milling machines, NC-programming},
-       pages = {210--230},
-       file = {Makhanov - 2007 - Optimization and correction of the tool path of th.pdf:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/66DXE4MG/Makhanov - 2007 - Optimization and correction of the tool path of th.pdf:application/pdf;ScienceDirect Snapshot:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/47EZGXVT/S0378475406003375.html:text/html}
-}
-
-@article{blackmore_analysis_1992,
-       title = {Analysis of {Swept} {Volume} via {Lie} {Groups} and {Differential} {Equations}},
-       volume = {11},
-       issn = {0278-3649},
-       url = {https://doi.org/10.1177/027836499201100602},
-       doi = {10.1177/027836499201100602},
-       abstract = {The development of useful mathematical techniques for an alyzing swept volumes, together with efficient means of im plementing these methods to produce serviceable models, has important applications to numerically controlled (NC) machin ing, robotics, and motion planning, as well as other areas of automation. In this article a novel approach to swept volumes is delineated—one that fully exploits the intrinsic geometric and group theoretical structure of Euclidean motions in or der to formulate the problem in the context of Lie groups and differential equations., Precise definitions of sweep and swept volume are given that lead naturally to an associated ordinary differential equation. This sweep differential equation is then shown to be related to the Lie group structure of Euclidean motions and to generate trajectories that completely determine the geometry of swept volumes., It is demonstrated that the notion of a sweep differential equation leads to criteria that provide useful insights concern ing the geometric and topologic features of swept volumes. Several new results characterizing swept volumes are obtained. For example, a number of simple properties that guarantee that the swept volume is a Cartesian product of elementary mani folds are identified. The criteria obtained may be readily tested with the aid of a computer.},
-       language = {en},
-       number = {6},
-       urldate = {2019-07-24},
-       journal = {The International Journal of Robotics Research},
-       author = {Blackmore, Denis and Leu, M.C.},
-       month = dec,
-       year = {1992},
-       pages = {516--537},
-       file = {SAGE PDF Full Text:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/NXPUV9CX/Blackmore et Leu - 1992 - Analysis of Swept Volume via Lie Groups and Differ.pdf:application/pdf}
-}
-
-@article{liu_tool_2015,
-       title = {A tool path generation method for freeform surface machining by introducing the tensor property of machining strip width},
-       volume = {66},
-       issn = {0010-4485},
-       url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0010448515000354},
-       doi = {10.1016/j.cad.2015.03.003},
-       abstract = {Due to the complexity of geometry, the feed direction with maximal machining strip width usually varies among different regions over a freeform surface or a shell of surfaces. However, in most traditional tool path generation methods, the surface is treated as one machining region thus only local optimisation might be achieved. This paper presents a new region-based tool path generation method. To achieve the full effect of the optimal feed direction, a surface is divided into several sub-surface regions before tool path computation. Different from the scalar field representation of the machining strip width, a rank-two tensor field is derived to evaluate the machining strip width using ball end mill. The continuous tensor field is able to represent the machining strip widths in all feed directions at each cutter contact point, except at the boundaries between sub-regions. Critical points where the tensor field is discontinuous are defined and classified. By applying critical points in the freeform surface as the start for constructing inside boundaries, the surface could be accurately divided to such that each region contain continuous distribution of feed directions with maximal machining strip width. As a result, tool paths are generated in each sub-surface separately to achieve better machining efficiency. The proposed method was tested using two freeform surfaces and the comparison to several leading existing tool path generation methods is also provided.},
-       urldate = {2019-09-07},
-       journal = {Computer-Aided Design},
-       author = {Liu, Xu and Li, Yingguang and Ma, Sibo and Lee, Chen-han},
-       month = sep,
-       year = {2015},
-       keywords = {Tool path, Ball end mill, Freeform surface machining, Machining strip width, Surface subdivision, Tensor},
-       pages = {1--13},
-       file = {Liu et al. - 2015 - A tool path generation method for freeform surface.pdf:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/2JUVUVWG/Liu et al. - 2015 - A tool path generation method for freeform surface.pdf:application/pdf}
-}
-
-@article{kumazawa_preferred_2015,
-       title = {Preferred feed direction field: {A} new tool path generation method for efficient sculptured surface machining},
-       volume = {67-68},
-       issn = {0010-4485},
-       shorttitle = {Preferred feed direction field},
-       url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0010448515000652},
-       doi = {10.1016/j.cad.2015.04.011},
-       abstract = {This paper presents a new method to generate efficient ball-end milling tool paths for three-axis sculptured surface machining. The fundamental principle of the presented method is to generate the tool paths according to a preferred feed direction (PFD) field derived from the surface to be machined. The PFD at any point on the surface is the feed direction that maximizes the machining strip width. Theoretically, tool paths that always follow the direction of maximum machining strip width at every cutter contact point on the surface would result in shorter overall tool path length. Unfortunately, overlaps of adjacent machining strips commonly exist for tool paths that follow the preferred directions exactly. Such redundant machining can be reduced by iso-scallop tool paths. Nonetheless, iso-scallop tool paths do not in general follow the preferred feed directions. To improve machining efficiency via generating short overall tool path length, the presented method analyzes the PFD field of the surface and segments the surface into distinct regions by identifying the degenerate points and forming their separatrices. The resulting segmented regions are characterized by similar PFD’s and iso-scallop tool paths are then generated for each region to mitigate redundant machining. The developed method has been validated with numerous case studies. The results have shown that the generated tool paths consistently have shorter overall length than those generated by the existing methods.},
-       urldate = {2019-09-07},
-       journal = {Computer-Aided Design},
-       author = {Kumazawa, Guillermo H. and Feng, Hsi-Yung and Barakchi Fard, M. Javad},
-       month = oct,
-       year = {2015},
-       keywords = {Sculptured surface, Machining efficiency, Ball-end milling, Iso-scallop tool paths, Preferred feed direction, Tensor field},
-       pages = {1--12},
-       file = {Kumazawa et al. - 2015 - Preferred feed direction field A new tool path ge.pdf:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/HGU5MJ7R/Kumazawa et al. - 2015 - Preferred feed direction field A new tool path ge.pdf:application/pdf}
-}
-
-@article{beudaert_maximum_nodate,
-       title = {Maximum {Feedrate} {Interpolator} for {Multi}-axis {CNC} {Machining} with {Jerk} {Constraints}},
-       abstract = {A key role of the CNC is to perform the feedrate interpolation which means to generate the setpoints for each machine tool axis. The aim of the VPOp algorithm is to make maximum use of the machine tool respecting both tangential and axis jerk on rotary and linear axes.},
-       language = {en},
-       author = {Beudaert, Xavier and Lavernhe, Sylvain and Tournier, Christophe},
-       pages = {7},
-       file = {Beudaert et al. - Maximum Feedrate Interpolator for Multi-axis CNC M.pdf:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/J6CAGQBP/Beudaert et al. - Maximum Feedrate Interpolator for Multi-axis CNC M.pdf:application/pdf}
-}
-
-@article{abdi_principal_2010,
-       title = {Principal component analysis},
-       volume = {2},
-       copyright = {Copyright © 2010 John Wiley \& Sons, Inc.},
-       issn = {1939-0068},
-       url = {https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/wics.101},
-       doi = {10.1002/wics.101},
-       abstract = {Principal component analysis (PCA) is a multivariate technique that analyzes a data table in which observations are described by several inter-correlated quantitative dependent variables. Its goal is to extract the important information from the table, to represent it as a set of new orthogonal variables called principal components, and to display the pattern of similarity of the observations and of the variables as points in maps. The quality of the PCA model can be evaluated using cross-validation techniques such as the bootstrap and the jackknife. PCA can be generalized as correspondence analysis (CA) in order to handle qualitative variables and as multiple factor analysis (MFA) in order to handle heterogeneous sets of variables. Mathematically, PCA depends upon the eigen-decomposition of positive semi-definite matrices and upon the singular value decomposition (SVD) of rectangular matrices. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley \& Sons, Inc. This article is categorized under: Statistical and Graphical Methods of Data Analysis {\textgreater} Multivariate Analysis Statistical and Graphical Methods of Data Analysis {\textgreater} Dimension Reduction},
-       language = {en},
-       number = {4},
-       urldate = {2019-11-08},
-       journal = {Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Computational Statistics},
-       author = {Abdi, Hervé and Williams, Lynne J.},
-       year = {2010},
-       keywords = {bilinear decomposition, factor scores and loadings, multiple factor analysis, RESS PRESS, singular and eigen value decomposition},
-       pages = {433--459},
-       file = {Abdi et Williams - 2010 - Principal component analysis.pdf:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/XEWNWHSM/Abdi et Williams - 2010 - Principal component analysis.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/WFM6FLNF/wics.html:text/html}
-}
\ No newline at end of file
diff --git a/Publis/imagesA0/3outils.png b/Publis/imagesA0/3outils.png
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 01fbe08..0000000
Binary files a/Publis/imagesA0/3outils.png and /dev/null differ
diff --git a/Publis/imagesA0/T1check.jpg b/Publis/imagesA0/T1check.jpg
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index d8d98d6..0000000
Binary files a/Publis/imagesA0/T1check.jpg and /dev/null differ
diff --git a/Publis/imagesA0/T2check.jpg b/Publis/imagesA0/T2check.jpg
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index f48faa0..0000000
Binary files a/Publis/imagesA0/T2check.jpg and /dev/null differ
diff --git a/Publis/imagesA0/cutterBE.png b/Publis/imagesA0/cutterBE.png
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 567b1ed..0000000
Binary files a/Publis/imagesA0/cutterBE.png and /dev/null differ
diff --git a/Publis/imagesA0/cutterT.png b/Publis/imagesA0/cutterT.png
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 699bdaa..0000000
Binary files a/Publis/imagesA0/cutterT.png and /dev/null differ
diff --git a/Publis/imagesA0/cuttersSlope.png b/Publis/imagesA0/cuttersSlope.png
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 72a3c96..0000000
Binary files a/Publis/imagesA0/cuttersSlope.png and /dev/null differ
diff --git a/Publis/imagesA0/cuttersSlope.xcf b/Publis/imagesA0/cuttersSlope.xcf
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 98f5fe7..0000000
Binary files a/Publis/imagesA0/cuttersSlope.xcf and /dev/null differ
diff --git a/Publis/imagesA0/end_mill_types.png b/Publis/imagesA0/end_mill_types.png
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index d09dbfa..0000000
Binary files a/Publis/imagesA0/end_mill_types.png and /dev/null differ
diff --git a/Publis/imagesA0/fc_check.jpg b/Publis/imagesA0/fc_check.jpg
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index bc21635..0000000
Binary files a/Publis/imagesA0/fc_check.jpg and /dev/null differ
diff --git a/Publis/imagesA0/inclined_choi.png b/Publis/imagesA0/inclined_choi.png
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 19a2aca..0000000
Binary files a/Publis/imagesA0/inclined_choi.png and /dev/null differ
diff --git a/Publis/imagesA0/inclined_tile.png b/Publis/imagesA0/inclined_tile.png
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 99d1546..0000000
Binary files a/Publis/imagesA0/inclined_tile.png and /dev/null differ
diff --git a/Publis/imagesA0/inclinedchoi_spheric.png b/Publis/imagesA0/inclinedchoi_spheric.png
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 7f9a550..0000000
Binary files a/Publis/imagesA0/inclinedchoi_spheric.png and /dev/null differ
diff --git a/Publis/imagesA0/inclinedchoi_toric.png b/Publis/imagesA0/inclinedchoi_toric.png
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 082ee70..0000000
Binary files a/Publis/imagesA0/inclinedchoi_toric.png and /dev/null differ
diff --git a/Publis/imagesA0/inclinedtile_spheric.png b/Publis/imagesA0/inclinedtile_spheric.png
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index ee06efc..0000000
Binary files a/Publis/imagesA0/inclinedtile_spheric.png and /dev/null differ
diff --git a/Publis/imagesA0/inclinedtile_toric.png b/Publis/imagesA0/inclinedtile_toric.png
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index bbd46a5..0000000
Binary files a/Publis/imagesA0/inclinedtile_toric.png and /dev/null differ
diff --git a/Publis/imagesA0/pdir_principle.pdf b/Publis/imagesA0/pdir_principle.pdf
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index c49da1b..0000000
Binary files a/Publis/imagesA0/pdir_principle.pdf and /dev/null differ
diff --git a/Publis/imagesA0/pdir_principle.pdf_tex b/Publis/imagesA0/pdir_principle.pdf_tex
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index d30651e..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,61 +0,0 @@
-%% Creator: Inkscape inkscape 0.92.4, www.inkscape.org
-%% PDF/EPS/PS + LaTeX output extension by Johan Engelen, 2010
-%% Accompanies image file 'pdir_principle.pdf' (pdf, eps, ps)
-%%
-%% To include the image in your LaTeX document, write
-%%   \input{<filename>.pdf_tex}
-%%  instead of
-%%   \includegraphics{<filename>.pdf}
-%% To scale the image, write
-%%   \def\svgwidth{<desired width>}
-%%   \input{<filename>.pdf_tex}
-%%  instead of
-%%   \includegraphics[width=<desired width>]{<filename>.pdf}
-%%
-%% Images with a different path to the parent latex file can
-%% be accessed with the `import' package (which may need to be
-%% installed) using
-%%   \usepackage{import}
-%% in the preamble, and then including the image with
-%%   \import{<path to file>}{<filename>.pdf_tex}
-%% Alternatively, one can specify
-%%   \graphicspath{{<path to file>/}}
-%% 
-%% For more information, please see info/svg-inkscape on CTAN:
-%%   http://tug.ctan.org/tex-archive/info/svg-inkscape
-%%
-\begingroup%
-  \makeatletter%
-  \providecommand\color[2][]{%
-    \errmessage{(Inkscape) Color is used for the text in Inkscape, but the package 'color.sty' is not loaded}%
-    \renewcommand\color[2][]{}%
-  }%
-  \providecommand\transparent[1]{%
-    \errmessage{(Inkscape) Transparency is used (non-zero) for the text in Inkscape, but the package 'transparent.sty' is not loaded}%
-    \renewcommand\transparent[1]{}%
-  }%
-  \providecommand\rotatebox[2]{#2}%
-  \newcommand*\fsize{\dimexpr\f@size pt\relax}%
-  \newcommand*\lineheight[1]{\fontsize{\fsize}{#1\fsize}\selectfont}%
-  \ifx\svgwidth\undefined%
-    \setlength{\unitlength}{351.41280047bp}%
-    \ifx\svgscale\undefined%
-      \relax%
-    \else%
-      \setlength{\unitlength}{\unitlength * \real{\svgscale}}%
-    \fi%
-  \else%
-    \setlength{\unitlength}{\svgwidth}%
-  \fi%
-  \global\let\svgwidth\undefined%
-  \global\let\svgscale\undefined%
-  \makeatother%
-  \begin{picture}(1,0.63490852)%
-    \lineheight{1}%
-    \setlength\tabcolsep{0pt}%
-    \put(0,0){\includegraphics[width=\unitlength,page=1]{pdir_principle.pdf}}%
-    \put(0.62340095,0.18454802){\color[rgb]{0,0,0}\makebox(0,0)[lt]{\lineheight{1.25}\smash{\begin{tabular}[t]{l}sample point $\mathbf{S_i}$\end{tabular}}}}%
-    \put(0.62340095,0.14198533){\color[rgb]{0,0,0}\makebox(0,0)[lt]{\lineheight{1.25}\smash{\begin{tabular}[t]{l}sample point projection \\on principal direction line.\\length: $d_i$\end{tabular}}}}%
-    \put(0.55706588,0.2311461){\color[rgb]{0,0,0}\makebox(0,0)[lt]{\lineheight{1.25}\smash{\begin{tabular}[t]{l}Legend:\end{tabular}}}}%
-  \end{picture}%
-\endgroup%
diff --git a/Publis/imagesA0/pdir_principle.svg b/Publis/imagesA0/pdir_principle.svg
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 900f59d..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,395 +0,0 @@
-<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="no"?>
-<!-- Created with Inkscape (http://www.inkscape.org/) -->
-
-<svg
-   xmlns:dc="http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/"
-   xmlns:cc="http://creativecommons.org/ns#"
-   xmlns:rdf="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#"
-   xmlns:svg="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg"
-   xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg"
-   xmlns:sodipodi="http://sodipodi.sourceforge.net/DTD/sodipodi-0.dtd"
-   xmlns:inkscape="http://www.inkscape.org/namespaces/inkscape"
-   width="123.97063mm"
-   height="78.710007mm"
-   viewBox="0 0 123.97063 78.710007"
-   version="1.1"
-   id="svg4566"
-   inkscape:version="0.92.4 (5da689c313, 2019-01-14)"
-   sodipodi:docname="uvmesh.svg">
-  <defs
-     id="defs4560" />
-  <sodipodi:namedview
-     id="base"
-     pagecolor="#ffffff"
-     bordercolor="#666666"
-     borderopacity="1.0"
-     inkscape:pageopacity="0.0"
-     inkscape:pageshadow="2"
-     inkscape:zoom="1.4"
-     inkscape:cx="248.51033"
-     inkscape:cy="192.13369"
-     inkscape:document-units="mm"
-     inkscape:current-layer="layer5"
-     showgrid="false"
-     inkscape:snap-grids="false"
-     inkscape:snap-text-baseline="true"
-     inkscape:object-paths="true"
-     inkscape:snap-to-guides="false"
-     inkscape:snap-others="false"
-     inkscape:snap-nodes="true"
-     inkscape:snap-bbox="true"
-     inkscape:bbox-paths="false"
-     inkscape:snap-bbox-midpoints="true"
-     inkscape:window-width="1600"
-     inkscape:window-height="1159"
-     inkscape:window-x="0"
-     inkscape:window-y="0"
-     inkscape:window-maximized="1"
-     inkscape:snap-global="false"
-     fit-margin-top="5"
-     fit-margin-right="5"
-     fit-margin-bottom="5"
-     fit-margin-left="5" />
-  <metadata
-     id="metadata4563">
-    <rdf:RDF>
-      <cc:Work
-         rdf:about="">
-        <dc:format>image/svg+xml</dc:format>
-        <dc:type
-           rdf:resource="http://purl.org/dc/dcmitype/StillImage" />
-        <dc:title></dc:title>
-      </cc:Work>
-    </rdf:RDF>
-  </metadata>
-  <g
-     inkscape:groupmode="layer"
-     id="layer2"
-     inkscape:label="surf"
-     style="display:inline"
-     sodipodi:insensitive="true"
-     transform="translate(-41.049667,-8.1920706)" />
-  <g
-     inkscape:label="isoU"
-     inkscape:groupmode="layer"
-     id="layer1"
-     style="display:inline"
-     sodipodi:insensitive="true"
-     transform="translate(-41.049667,-8.1920706)" />
-  <g
-     inkscape:groupmode="layer"
-     id="layer3"
-     inkscape:label="isoV"
-     style="display:inline"
-     sodipodi:insensitive="true"
-     transform="translate(-41.049667,-8.1920706)" />
-  <g
-     inkscape:groupmode="layer"
-     id="layer4"
-     inkscape:label="direction"
-     style="display:inline"
-     sodipodi:insensitive="true"
-     transform="translate(-41.049667,-8.1920706)">
-    <text
-       xml:space="preserve"
-       style="font-style:normal;font-weight:normal;font-size:7.05555534px;line-height:1.25;font-family:sans-serif;letter-spacing:0px;word-spacing:0px;fill:#000000;fill-opacity:1;stroke:none;stroke-width:0.26458332"
-       x="152.60788"
-       y="163.95238"
-       id="text5313"><tspan
-         sodipodi:role="line"
-         id="tspan5311"
-         x="152.60788"
-         y="170.19489"
-         style="stroke-width:0.26458332" /></text>
-  </g>
-  <g
-     inkscape:groupmode="layer"
-     id="layer5"
-     inkscape:label="légende"
-     style="display:inline"
-     transform="translate(-41.049667,-8.1920706)">
-    <path
-       style="display:inline;fill:none;stroke:#000000;stroke-width:0.5291667;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:miter;stroke-miterlimit:4;stroke-dasharray:none;stroke-opacity:1"
-       d="M 46.689816,57.517906 C 63.48618,60.33536 80.483398,65.258508 98.557918,81.475848 108.56584,61.949463 126.25873,46.259607 146.54803,31.865961 140.33655,25.381593 135.10971,18.718476 122.06823,13.474006 90.750163,24.033739 68.505093,40.632778 46.689816,57.517906 Z"
-       id="path4568"
-       inkscape:connector-curvature="0"
-       sodipodi:nodetypes="ccccc" />
-    <path
-       style="display:inline;fill:none;stroke:#000000;stroke-width:0.26458332;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:miter;stroke-miterlimit:4;stroke-dasharray:none;stroke-opacity:1"
-       d="m 52.365187,53.147076 c 24.835306,2.666957 38.38369,13.74418 49.140173,23.04474"
-       id="path4570"
-       inkscape:connector-curvature="0"
-       sodipodi:nodetypes="cc" />
-    <path
-       sodipodi:nodetypes="cc"
-       inkscape:connector-curvature="0"
-       id="path4572"
-       d="m 57.806743,49.025873 c 14.468984,0.696804 31.588914,9.689282 47.015427,22.058146"
-       style="display:inline;fill:none;stroke:#000000;stroke-width:0.26458332;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:miter;stroke-miterlimit:4;stroke-dasharray:none;stroke-opacity:1" />
-    <path
-       style="display:inline;fill:none;stroke:#000000;stroke-width:0.26458332;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:miter;stroke-miterlimit:4;stroke-dasharray:none;stroke-opacity:1"
-       d="m 63.701306,44.68274 c 16.68798,2.455751 31.4351,11.475831 44.486774,21.838528"
-       id="path4574"
-       inkscape:connector-curvature="0"
-       sodipodi:nodetypes="cc" />
-    <path
-       sodipodi:nodetypes="cc"
-       inkscape:connector-curvature="0"
-       id="path4576"
-       d="m 70.0099,40.219311 c 16.013122,3.273152 30.07071,12.408093 41.99177,21.673804"
-       style="display:inline;fill:none;stroke:#000000;stroke-width:0.26458332;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:miter;stroke-miterlimit:4;stroke-dasharray:none;stroke-opacity:1" />
-    <path
-       style="display:inline;fill:none;stroke:#000000;stroke-width:0.26458332;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:miter;stroke-miterlimit:4;stroke-dasharray:none;stroke-opacity:1"
-       d="m 76.58941,35.809394 c 15.816425,4.546803 28.29698,13.036601 39.75583,21.330258"
-       id="path4578"
-       inkscape:connector-curvature="0"
-       sodipodi:nodetypes="cc" />
-    <path
-       sodipodi:nodetypes="cc"
-       inkscape:connector-curvature="0"
-       id="path4580"
-       d="M 82.572994,32.042798 C 98.035867,36.551956 110.5095,43.862579 120.99451,52.510423"
-       style="display:inline;fill:none;stroke:#000000;stroke-width:0.26458332;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:miter;stroke-miterlimit:4;stroke-dasharray:none;stroke-opacity:1" />
-    <path
-       style="display:inline;fill:none;stroke:#000000;stroke-width:0.26458332;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:miter;stroke-miterlimit:4;stroke-dasharray:none;stroke-opacity:1"
-       d="M 89.406465,28.044918 C 106.21893,32.609317 116.12015,40.20979 125.84376,48.067732"
-       id="path4582"
-       inkscape:connector-curvature="0"
-       sodipodi:nodetypes="cc" />
-    <path
-       sodipodi:nodetypes="cc"
-       inkscape:connector-curvature="0"
-       id="path4584"
-       d="m 95.809993,24.601171 c 11.583377,2.719254 22.818757,10.17046 34.982337,19.248341"
-       style="display:inline;fill:none;stroke:#000000;stroke-width:0.26458332;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:miter;stroke-miterlimit:4;stroke-dasharray:none;stroke-opacity:1" />
-    <path
-       style="display:inline;fill:none;stroke:#000000;stroke-width:0.26458332;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:miter;stroke-miterlimit:4;stroke-dasharray:none;stroke-opacity:1"
-       d="m 102.06274,21.521772 c 14.58462,4.937148 23.97186,11.926096 32.97545,18.911152"
-       id="path4586"
-       inkscape:connector-curvature="0"
-       sodipodi:nodetypes="cc" />
-    <path
-       sodipodi:nodetypes="cc"
-       inkscape:connector-curvature="0"
-       id="path4588"
-       d="m 108.87147,18.481315 c 13.94804,5.693631 22.71866,11.723482 30.05439,18.957702"
-       style="display:inline;fill:none;stroke:#000000;stroke-width:0.26458332;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:miter;stroke-miterlimit:4;stroke-dasharray:none;stroke-opacity:1" />
-    <path
-       style="display:inline;fill:none;stroke:#000000;stroke-width:0.26458332;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:miter;stroke-miterlimit:4;stroke-dasharray:none;stroke-opacity:1"
-       d="m 115.23004,15.926994 c 11.43179,3.703157 19.82567,10.818675 27.64164,18.583338"
-       id="path4590"
-       inkscape:connector-curvature="0"
-       sodipodi:nodetypes="cc" />
-    <path
-       style="display:inline;fill:none;stroke:#000000;stroke-width:0.26458332;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:miter;stroke-miterlimit:4;stroke-dasharray:none;stroke-opacity:1"
-       d="M 75.722044,66.06726 C 95.403698,47.209502 115.08535,32.61665 134.767,20.52415"
-       id="path5153"
-       inkscape:connector-curvature="0"
-       sodipodi:nodetypes="cc" />
-    <path
-       style="display:inline;fill:none;stroke:#000000;stroke-width:0.26458332;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:miter;stroke-miterlimit:4;stroke-dasharray:none;stroke-opacity:1"
-       d="m 88.02613,73.157727 c 13.34158,-18.600314 32.59163,-33.758282 52.8242,-47.268913"
-       id="path5155"
-       inkscape:connector-curvature="0"
-       sodipodi:nodetypes="cc" />
-    <path
-       style="display:inline;fill:none;stroke:#000000;stroke-width:0.26458332;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:miter;stroke-miterlimit:4;stroke-dasharray:none;stroke-opacity:1"
-       d="M 61.761489,60.834819 C 82.80206,41.84686 105.54086,28.793495 128.49239,16.483548"
-       id="path5157"
-       inkscape:connector-curvature="0"
-       sodipodi:nodetypes="cc" />
-    <path
-       style="display:inline;fill:none;stroke:#000000;stroke-width:0.26458332;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:miter;stroke-miterlimit:4;stroke-dasharray:none;stroke-opacity:1"
-       d="M 54.431251,58.995098 C 72.869616,44.687024 87.628157,30.675249 125.19868,14.826645"
-       id="path5159"
-       inkscape:connector-curvature="0"
-       sodipodi:nodetypes="cc" />
-    <path
-       style="display:inline;fill:none;stroke:#000000;stroke-width:0.26458332;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:miter;stroke-miterlimit:4;stroke-dasharray:none;stroke-opacity:1"
-       d="M 69.058514,63.244972 C 89.321242,43.958194 110.30398,30.182961 131.53061,18.274668"
-       id="path5161"
-       inkscape:connector-curvature="0"
-       sodipodi:nodetypes="cc" />
-    <path
-       style="display:inline;fill:none;stroke:#000000;stroke-width:0.26458332;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:miter;stroke-miterlimit:4;stroke-dasharray:none;stroke-opacity:1"
-       d="M 82.341305,69.554871 C 98.795295,51.069642 117.80229,36.011719 137.79094,23.000254"
-       id="path5163"
-       inkscape:connector-curvature="0"
-       sodipodi:nodetypes="cc" />
-    <path
-       style="display:inline;fill:none;stroke:#000000;stroke-width:0.26458332;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:miter;stroke-miterlimit:4;stroke-dasharray:none;stroke-opacity:1"
-       d="M 93.529142,77.226365 C 105.77767,56.744329 127.98305,39.175325 143.72777,28.87555"
-       id="path5165"
-       inkscape:connector-curvature="0"
-       sodipodi:nodetypes="cc" />
-    <g
-       style="display:inline;stroke-width:1.56068039"
-       id="g5429"
-       transform="matrix(0.64124227,0,0,0.64025048,35.540598,-31.238725)">
-      <path
-         sodipodi:nodetypes="cc"
-         inkscape:connector-curvature="0"
-         id="path5171"
-         d="m 48.042166,131.54107 19.380782,7.32175"
-         style="display:inline;fill:none;stroke:#ff0000;stroke-width:0.41292998;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:miter;stroke-miterlimit:4;stroke-dasharray:1.65172007, 0.41293001;stroke-dashoffset:0;stroke-opacity:1" />
-      <circle
-         r="1"
-         cy="131.58037"
-         cx="48.058037"
-         id="path5169"
-         style="display:inline;fill:#ff0000;fill-opacity:1;stroke:none;stroke-width:0.82585996;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:bevel;stroke-miterlimit:4;stroke-dasharray:none;stroke-dashoffset:0;stroke-opacity:1;paint-order:markers fill stroke" />
-      <path
-         sodipodi:nodetypes="ccc"
-         inkscape:connector-curvature="0"
-         id="path5173"
-         d="m 65.163716,138.00932 1.987753,-1.33763 2.302633,0.92461"
-         style="display:inline;fill:none;stroke:#f80000;stroke-width:0.41292998px;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:miter;stroke-opacity:1" />
-      <path
-         sodipodi:nodetypes="cc"
-         inkscape:connector-curvature="0"
-         id="path5167"
-         d="M 44.034226,155.06993 162.52976,73.61607"
-         style="display:inline;fill:none;stroke:#ff0000;stroke-width:1.23879004;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:miter;stroke-miterlimit:4;stroke-dasharray:none;stroke-opacity:1" />
-      <path
-         sodipodi:nodetypes="cc"
-         inkscape:connector-curvature="0"
-         id="path5171-3"
-         d="m 90.983907,110.16244 10.959943,5.1004"
-         style="display:inline;fill:none;stroke:#ff0000;stroke-width:0.41292998;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:miter;stroke-miterlimit:4;stroke-dasharray:1.65172008, 0.41293001;stroke-dashoffset:0;stroke-opacity:1" />
-      <circle
-         r="1"
-         cy="110.16244"
-         cx="91.00753"
-         id="path5169-6"
-         style="display:inline;fill:#ff0000;fill-opacity:1;stroke:none;stroke-width:0.82585996;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:bevel;stroke-miterlimit:4;stroke-dasharray:none;stroke-dashoffset:0;stroke-opacity:1;paint-order:markers fill stroke" />
-      <path
-         sodipodi:nodetypes="ccc"
-         inkscape:connector-curvature="0"
-         id="path5173-7"
-         d="m 99.494781,114.12312 2.331709,-1.28704 2.09134,1.06984"
-         style="display:inline;fill:none;stroke:#f80000;stroke-width:0.41292998px;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:miter;stroke-opacity:1" />
-      <path
-         sodipodi:nodetypes="cc"
-         inkscape:connector-curvature="0"
-         id="path5171-3-5"
-         d="m 99.02839,136.44666 -15.856164,-8.2802"
-         style="display:inline;fill:none;stroke:#ff0000;stroke-width:0.41292998;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:miter;stroke-miterlimit:4;stroke-dasharray:1.6517201, 0.41293001;stroke-dashoffset:0;stroke-opacity:1" />
-      <circle
-         transform="rotate(-177.91625)"
-         r="1"
-         cy="-132.92101"
-         cx="-103.90652"
-         id="path5169-6-3"
-         style="display:inline;fill:#ff0000;fill-opacity:1;stroke:none;stroke-width:0.82585996;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:bevel;stroke-miterlimit:4;stroke-dasharray:none;stroke-dashoffset:0;stroke-opacity:1;paint-order:markers fill stroke" />
-      <path
-         sodipodi:nodetypes="ccc"
-         inkscape:connector-curvature="0"
-         id="path5173-7-5"
-         d="m 85.348417,129.30288 -1.98031,1.29532 -2.267489,-1.00772"
-         style="display:inline;fill:none;stroke:#f80000;stroke-width:0.41292998px;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:miter;stroke-opacity:1" />
-      <path
-         sodipodi:nodetypes="cc"
-         inkscape:connector-curvature="0"
-         id="path5171-3-5-6"
-         d="M 143.01593,107.8575 126.59039,98.320799"
-         style="display:inline;fill:none;stroke:#ff0000;stroke-width:0.41292998;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:miter;stroke-miterlimit:4;stroke-dasharray:1.65172011, 0.41293001;stroke-dashoffset:0;stroke-opacity:1" />
-      <circle
-         transform="rotate(-177.91625)"
-         r="0.99999994"
-         cy="-102.62476"
-         cx="-146.90596"
-         id="path5169-6-3-2"
-         style="display:inline;fill:#ff0000;fill-opacity:1;stroke:none;stroke-width:0.82585996;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:bevel;stroke-miterlimit:4;stroke-dasharray:none;stroke-dashoffset:0;stroke-opacity:1;paint-order:markers fill stroke" />
-      <path
-         sodipodi:nodetypes="ccc"
-         inkscape:connector-curvature="0"
-         id="path5173-7-5-9"
-         d="m 128.85905,99.637988 -1.98031,1.295322 -2.28731,-1.238423"
-         style="display:inline;fill:none;stroke:#f80000;stroke-width:0.41292998px;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:miter;stroke-opacity:1" />
-      <path
-         sodipodi:nodetypes="cc"
-         inkscape:connector-curvature="0"
-         id="path5171-1"
-         d="m 129.38348,79.591286 14.67389,6.72271"
-         style="display:inline;fill:none;stroke:#ff0000;stroke-width:0.41292998;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:miter;stroke-miterlimit:4;stroke-dasharray:1.65172008, 0.41293001;stroke-dashoffset:0;stroke-opacity:1" />
-      <circle
-         r="1"
-         cy="79.615067"
-         cx="129.40675"
-         id="path5169-2"
-         style="display:inline;fill:#ff0000;fill-opacity:1;stroke:none;stroke-width:0.82585996;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:bevel;stroke-miterlimit:4;stroke-dasharray:none;stroke-dashoffset:0;stroke-opacity:1;paint-order:markers fill stroke" />
-      <path
-         sodipodi:nodetypes="ccc"
-         inkscape:connector-curvature="0"
-         id="path5173-70"
-         d="m 141.41288,85.102449 2.05079,-1.084276 2.36028,1.081477"
-         style="display:inline;fill:none;stroke:#f80000;stroke-width:0.41292998px;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:miter;stroke-opacity:1" />
-    </g>
-    <rect
-       style="display:inline;fill:#ffffff;fill-opacity:1;stroke:#000000;stroke-width:0.26458332;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:bevel;stroke-miterlimit:4;stroke-dasharray:none;stroke-dashoffset:0;stroke-opacity:1;paint-order:markers fill stroke"
-       id="rect5462"
-       width="51.504539"
-       height="24.199944"
-       x="108.38346"
-       y="54.737762" />
-    <ellipse
-       style="display:inline;fill:#ff0000;fill-opacity:1;stroke:none;stroke-width:0.52916664;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:bevel;stroke-miterlimit:4;stroke-dasharray:none;stroke-dashoffset:0;stroke-opacity:1;paint-order:markers fill stroke"
-       id="path5169-6-9"
-       cx="116.39146"
-       cy="63.313519"
-       rx="0.64124227"
-       ry="0.6402505" />
-    <path
-       style="display:inline;fill:none;stroke:#ff0000;stroke-width:0.26458332;stroke-linecap:butt;stroke-linejoin:miter;stroke-miterlimit:4;stroke-dasharray:1.05833336, 0.26458333;stroke-dashoffset:0;stroke-opacity:1"
-       d="M 117.0035,69.724021 110.97226,67.364"
-       id="path5171-3-5-3"
-       inkscape:connector-curvature="0"
-       sodipodi:nodetypes="cc" />
-    <text
-       xml:space="preserve"
-       style="font-style:normal;font-variant:normal;font-weight:normal;font-stretch:normal;font-size:2.71249199px;line-height:1.25;font-family:sans-serif;-inkscape-font-specification:'sans-serif, Normal';font-variant-ligatures:normal;font-variant-caps:normal;font-variant-numeric:normal;font-feature-settings:normal;text-align:start;letter-spacing:0px;word-spacing:0px;writing-mode:lr-tb;text-anchor:start;display:inline;fill:#000000;fill-opacity:1;stroke:none;stroke-width:0.26458332"
-       x="118.24153"
-       y="64.073112"
-       id="text5309"
-       transform="scale(1.0007742,0.99922637)"><tspan
-         sodipodi:role="line"
-         id="tspan5307"
-         x="118.24153"
-         y="64.073112"
-         style="font-style:normal;font-variant:normal;font-weight:normal;font-stretch:normal;font-size:2.71249199px;font-family:sans-serif;-inkscape-font-specification:'sans-serif, Normal';font-variant-ligatures:normal;font-variant-caps:normal;font-variant-numeric:normal;font-feature-settings:normal;text-align:start;writing-mode:lr-tb;text-anchor:start;stroke-width:0.26458332">sample point $\mathbf{S_i}$</tspan></text>
-    <text
-       xml:space="preserve"
-       style="font-style:normal;font-variant:normal;font-weight:normal;font-stretch:normal;font-size:2.71249199px;line-height:1.25;font-family:sans-serif;-inkscape-font-specification:'sans-serif, Normal';font-variant-ligatures:normal;font-variant-caps:normal;font-variant-numeric:normal;font-feature-settings:normal;text-align:start;letter-spacing:0px;word-spacing:0px;writing-mode:lr-tb;text-anchor:start;display:inline;fill:#000000;fill-opacity:1;stroke:none;stroke-width:0.26458332"
-       x="118.24153"
-       y="69.353722"
-       id="text5309-5"
-       transform="scale(1.0007742,0.99922637)"><tspan
-         sodipodi:role="line"
-         id="tspan5307-8"
-         x="118.24153"
-         y="69.353722"
-         style="font-style:normal;font-variant:normal;font-weight:normal;font-stretch:normal;font-size:2.71249199px;font-family:sans-serif;-inkscape-font-specification:'sans-serif, Normal';font-variant-ligatures:normal;font-variant-caps:normal;font-variant-numeric:normal;font-feature-settings:normal;text-align:start;writing-mode:lr-tb;text-anchor:start;stroke-width:0.26458332">sample point projection </tspan><tspan
-         sodipodi:role="line"
-         x="118.24153"
-         y="72.744339"
-         style="font-style:normal;font-variant:normal;font-weight:normal;font-stretch:normal;font-size:2.71249199px;font-family:sans-serif;-inkscape-font-specification:'sans-serif, Normal';font-variant-ligatures:normal;font-variant-caps:normal;font-variant-numeric:normal;font-feature-settings:normal;text-align:start;writing-mode:lr-tb;text-anchor:start;stroke-width:0.26458332"
-         id="tspan5390">on principal direction line.</tspan><tspan
-         sodipodi:role="line"
-         x="118.24153"
-         y="76.134949"
-         style="font-style:normal;font-variant:normal;font-weight:normal;font-stretch:normal;font-size:2.71249199px;font-family:sans-serif;-inkscape-font-specification:'sans-serif, Normal';font-variant-ligatures:normal;font-variant-caps:normal;font-variant-numeric:normal;font-feature-settings:normal;text-align:start;writing-mode:lr-tb;text-anchor:start;stroke-width:0.26458332"
-         id="tspan5392">length: $d_i$</tspan></text>
-    <text
-       xml:space="preserve"
-       style="font-style:normal;font-weight:normal;font-size:4.52082014px;line-height:1.25;font-family:sans-serif;letter-spacing:0px;word-spacing:0px;display:inline;fill:#000000;fill-opacity:1;stroke:none;stroke-width:0.26458332"
-       x="110.02429"
-       y="58.291847"
-       id="text5460"
-       transform="scale(1.0007742,0.99922637)"><tspan
-         sodipodi:role="line"
-         id="tspan5458"
-         x="110.02429"
-         y="58.291847"
-         style="font-style:normal;font-variant:normal;font-weight:normal;font-stretch:normal;font-size:2.71249199px;font-family:sans-serif;-inkscape-font-specification:'sans-serif, Normal';font-variant-ligatures:normal;font-variant-caps:normal;font-variant-numeric:normal;font-feature-settings:normal;text-align:start;writing-mode:lr-tb;text-anchor:start;stroke-width:0.26458332">Legend:</tspan></text>
-  </g>
-</svg>
diff --git a/Publis/imagesA0/plan_principal.png b/Publis/imagesA0/plan_principal.png
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index ac977d0..0000000
Binary files a/Publis/imagesA0/plan_principal.png and /dev/null differ
diff --git a/Publis/imagesA0/plan_slope.png b/Publis/imagesA0/plan_slope.png
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 6f1fdd0..0000000
Binary files a/Publis/imagesA0/plan_slope.png and /dev/null differ
diff --git a/Publis/imagesA0/reff_torus.png b/Publis/imagesA0/reff_torus.png
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index c6fe60c..0000000
Binary files a/Publis/imagesA0/reff_torus.png and /dev/null differ
diff --git a/Publis/imagesA0/sc_check.jpg b/Publis/imagesA0/sc_check.jpg
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 4684678..0000000
Binary files a/Publis/imagesA0/sc_check.jpg and /dev/null differ