The Higher Education and Research forge

Home My Page Projects Code Snippets Project Openings Complex Surface Machining Optimization
Summary Activity SCM

SCM Repository

authorJean-Max Redonnet <jean-max.redonnet@unniv-tlse3.fr>
Wed, 27 May 2020 19:36:24 +0000 (21:36 +0200)
committerJean-Max Redonnet <jean-max.redonnet@unniv-tlse3.fr>
Wed, 27 May 2020 19:36:24 +0000 (21:36 +0200)
Publis/IJAMT2020/v1.0/biblio.bib
Publis/IJAMT2020/v1.0/main.tex

index 1421419..e76c75c 100644 (file)
@@ -445,7 +445,7 @@ sculptured surfaces},
        file = {Abdi et Williams - 2010 - Principal component analysis.pdf:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/XEWNWHSM/Abdi et Williams - 2010 - Principal component analysis.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/WFM6FLNF/wics.html:text/html}
 }
 
-@article{vu_new_2018,
+@article{duc_new_2018,
        title = {A new optimization tool path planning for 3-axis end milling of free-form surfaces based on efficient machining intervals},
        volume = {1960},
        issn = {0094-243X},
@@ -458,3 +458,14 @@ sculptured surfaces},
        pages = {070011},
        file = {Snapshot:/home/mahfoud/Zotero/storage/UEPKAJC9/1.html:text/html}
 }
+
+@article{duc_automatic_2020,
+author = {Duc, Vu and Monies, Frederic and Segonds, Stéphane and Rubio, Walter},
+year = {2020},
+month = {09},
+pages = {4239--4254},
+title = {Automatic minimal partitioning method guaranteeing machining efficiency of free-form surfaces using a toroidal tool},
+volume = {107},
+journal = {The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology},
+doi = {10.1007/s00170-020-05221-0}
+}
index b6badaf..643165e 100644 (file)
@@ -57,7 +57,7 @@ First, an analytical analysis deals with the simple case of an inclined plane. T
 
 The quality constraint of the surface is commonly expressed in terms of maximum scallop height, denoted $sh$, which corresponds to the residual stock thickness left unmachined by the tool between two adjacent trajectories. This value imposes the step-over distance $sod$ that can be used during the milling of the surface. Roughly speaking, the step-over distance is the distance between two adjacent trajectories. The relation between $sh$ and $sod$ is well-known and fully developed in \cite{redonnet_study_2013}. The step-over distance is a key parameter for end-milling of free-form surfaces because, for a given scallop height, a greater $sod$ leads to fewer trajectories and thus a reduced machining time.
 
-Numerous authors have addressed these issues \cite{kumazawa_preferred_2015,liu_tool_2015,chiou_machining_2002,blackmore_analysis_1992,mann_generalization_2002}. A lot of them use the concepts of effective radius and sweep curve to do so. The sweep curve is the curve lying on the spinning cutter envelope surface, that defines the final profile of the cutter passage \cite{sheltami_swept_1998,roth_surface_2001}. From a kinematics point of view, the sweep curve is given by $\mathbf{n} \cdot \mathbf{F} = 0$ where $\mathbf{F}$ is the feed direction and $\mathbf{n}$ the normal vector that can be calculated in each point of the cutter surface of revolution. Then, for a given cutter, the effective radius (denoted $R_{eff}$) is defined as the radius of curvature at the cutter contact point of the projection, in a plane normal to the feed direction, of the sweep curve. The direct impact of the effective radius on machining time is thus well established. But effective radius calculation may indeed vary a lot depending on the cutter geometry in use.
+Numerous authors have addressed these issues \cite{kumazawa_preferred_2015,liu_tool_2015,chiou_machining_2002,blackmore_analysis_1992,mann_generalization_2002}. A lot of them use the concepts of effective radius and sweep curve to do so. The sweep curve is the curve lying on the spinning cutter envelope surface, that defines the final profile of the cutter passage \cite{sheltami_swept_1998,roth_surface_2001}. From a kinematics point of view, the sweep curve is given by $\mathbf{n} \cdot \mathbf{F} = 0$ where $\mathbf{F}$ is the feed direction and $\mathbf{n}$ the normal vector that can be calculated in each point of the cutter surface of revolution. Then, for a given cutter, the effective radius (denoted $R_{eff}$) is defined as the radius of curvature at the cutter contact point of the projection, in a plane normal to the feed direction, of the sweep curve. The direct impact of the effective radius on machining time is thus well established\cite{duc_automatic_2020}. But effective radius calculation may indeed vary a lot depending on the cutter geometry in use.
 
 \subsubsection{Cutter types}
 End-milling of free-form surfaces can be performed with various kind of tools. Actually three types are commonly used (figure \ref{fig:end_mill_types}):
@@ -579,7 +579,8 @@ The first test case is a B\'ezier surface of $3\times3$ control points given in
  \caption{Cartesian coordinates of test surface 1 control points}
  \label{tab:tile}
 \end{table}
-This surface have been used in \cite{vu_new_2018} and it is illustrated in figure \ref{fig:tile} where the axis $\mathbf{X}$, respectively $\mathbf{Y}$ and $\mathbf{Z}$ is represented by the red, respectively green and blue vector.
+
+This surface have been used in \cite{duc_new_2018,duc_automatic_2020} and it is illustrated in figure \ref{fig:tile} where the axis $\mathbf{X}$, respectively $\mathbf{Y}$ and $\mathbf{Z}$ is represented by the red, respectively green and blue vector.
 \begin{figure}[ht]
  \centering
  \includegraphics[width=\linewidth]{inclined_tile.png}
@@ -801,6 +802,7 @@ This work is only a first approach to cutter type selection problem using princi
 
 \vspace{\baselineskip}
 \appendix
+
 \section{Study of the critical parameter $\mu_c = f(s)$}
 The expression of the critical parameter $s_c = f(\mu)$ have been developed in section \ref{sec:critP}. The reciprocal function $\mu_c = f(s)$ is far less interesting from a practical point of view, however some use cases may be thought up, especially at the conception stage of the part.